IRFCA Mailing List Archive

Messages 1381 - 1400

Previous 20 Messages          Archive Index          Next 20 Messages

From: T.H.Sanyal. <THS1@PSUVM.EMAIL

Subject: Re: Imported locos - personal opinion

Date: 10 Jan 1995 10:49:00 -0500


>Re the Locos built in Australia - India can launch a
>satellite but it can't build its own high speed
>loco? Personally a lot more can be done if railway
>R&D is given to private enterprise.

Private Enterprise is the panacea? Well, Automobile production in
India is in private sector. Do you know of any car of 100% Indian
design? Moreover, ISRO is a govt outfit the last time I looked.
Kind of deflates the pet theory that private enterprise is invariably
better than the public enterprise, no?
T.H.Sanyal.

From: Pushkar Apte <apte@spdc.email

Subject: Re: Imported locos - personal opinion

Date: 10 Jan 1995 08:19:00 -0500


Sorry if a meaningless message got broadcast earlier - my mailer got
hung.

> >Re the Locos built in Australia - India can launch a
> >satellite but it can't build its own high speed
> >loco? Personally a lot more can be done if railway
> >R&D is given to private enterprise.

Sanjay, perhaps you could give us some more details of RDSO, since
your father has worked there. I have always wondered what we (India)
do - even for namesake - in R&D in IR.

> Private Enterprise is the panacea? Well, Automobile production in
> India is in private sector. Do you know of any car of 100% Indian
> design? Moreover, ISRO is a govt outfit the last time I looked.
> Kind of deflates the pet theory that private enterprise is invariably
> better than the public enterprise, no?

Actually, it doesn't. The Indian car industry is undoubtedly the
slime pit of the entire world - I wouldn't be surprised if Bangladesh
had more decent cars. But the underlying reason is the lack of
competition. Open the Indian markets to all foreign imports and the
Indian car companies will have to clean their act up in a hurry, or
die. Same thing that happened to Detroit and European carmakers -
Toyota set a new standard and everyone had to follow. IMO, fierce
competition is the key to quality services and value-for-money - and
that can only happen with pure laissez-faire capitalism, which India
does not have either in cars or in locos.

Regards,
Pushkar
-------

From: T.H.Sanyal. <THS1@PSUVM.EMAIL

Subject: Re: Imported locos - personal opinion

Date: 10 Jan 1995 12:47:00 -0500


Pushkar wrote:

>Actually, it doesn't. The Indian car industry is undoubtedly the
>slime pit of the entire world - I wouldn't be surprised if Bangladesh
>had more decent cars. But the underlying reason is the lack of
>competition. Open the Indian markets to all foreign imports and the
>Indian car companies will have to clean their act up in a hurry, or
>die. Same thing that happened to Detroit and European carmakers -
>Toyota set a new standard and everyone had to follow. IMO, fierce
>competition is the key to quality services and value-for-money - and
>that can only happen with pure laissez-faire capitalism, which India
>does not have either in cars or in locos.

Pure Laissez-faire Capitalism? You will not find it outside of
Economics textbooks and papers. Do you remember what happened under
Reagan when Conrail started making profit? They privatized it, to
save their theory that govt operated company must be inefficient.
Look around, and you will find many "successful" private enterprises
feeding on public trough.
T.H.Sanyal.

From: S Pai <Pai>>

Subject: Bangalore--light rail

Date: 14 Jan 1995 22:14:00 -0500


This article is from misc.news.southasia.

-Satish

------------------------------------------------------------
* New rail system for Bangalore city

BANGALORE: The garden city of Bangalore is likely to get a new light
rail system to meet its traffic needs in the next century.
The first phase of the rail project would be completed by the year
2000, city development minister Roshan Baig said.
Global tenders would be floated on Jan 16 for a gigantic Rs 4,000
crore Light Rail Transit for Bangalore.
The LRT system, capable of meeting the travel demands of
Bangalore in the next century, consists of electric AC trains which will
run at an average speed of 40 km hour on elevated viaducts, about 20 ft
above the roads.

From: PTA & IT <harsh@rscbrc.email

Subject: email from RSBRC

Date: 18 Jan 1995 14:39:00 -0500


Thanks for your suggestion. We need more of them.
There is something urgent. Foreign financial institutions in
collaboration with private sector may be interested in undertaking
railway construction projects on Build Operate/Lease Transfer basis.
We want to understand the legal implication and frame proper terms and
conditions for the evaluation of competitive bids. Surely such
arrangements are existing elsewhere we can copy and enhance/modify to
suit our genius. We need as much information as possible. We have to run
courses for heads of departments and top management. Please tell all
other friends also. THe projects may be like construction of new line,
Doubling, gauge conversion, Loco sheds and many others.
Please tell all members and respond quickly.

Harsh Kumar Phone: DOT : 91-265-551873 (O) 91-265-427375 (R)
Professor IT & AT FAX : 91-265-420067; Auto: 5046 (O) 5047 (R)
Railway Staff College, E-Mail: harsh@rscbrc.email
Vadodara 390 004

From: S Pai <Pai>>

Subject: news articles

Date: 30 Jan 1995 16:53:00 -0500


Here are two news articles that I came across recently, one on the proposed
Bangalore light rail system and another on the ABB loco deal. There is not
much new information in them, though.

-Satish
------------------------------------------------------------

Bangalore seeks foreign partners for $ 2 bln elevated light rail network

[Singapore Press Holdings]
By S N Vasuki
01/17/95
SINGAPORE -Bangalore has become the second Indian city seeking
foreign participation in an elevated light rail transit (LRT)
system aimed at enhancing public transport.

An advertisement inviting joint venture partners for the
ambitious $2 billion project appeared in Business Times yesterday,
and officials hope to receive strong expressions of interest from
Singapore and East Asian companies.

Earlier this month, a Singapore consortium clinched a deal to
develop an international airport in the same city.

The launch of the Bangalore LRT project -the principal promoter
of which is the provincial government of Karnataka -comes three
months after the Indian government floated a tender for a similar
system in the country's capital, New Delhi.

Global tenders were floated in early October for a $1.45
billion, 176 km high-speed LRT project there. Tenders for that
project close this week and construction work on the first phase is
expected to start by June.

The managing director of the Bangalore Mass Rapid Transit, K P
Singh, said yesterday a feasibility study had recommended
implementation of the project in four phases that would eventually
cover a network of six routes over 90 km.

Total project cost is estimated at $2 billion. The cost of
building the first phase, which will be 24 km, is estimated at
around $600 million.

The consortium that wins the tender will build the first phase
and have the first option to construct the remaining phases.

"We are seeking partners who will implement the project on a
build-own-operate-transfer basis with an initial 30-year concession
period," Mr Singh said. "The Karnataka government is willing to
take a minority equity stake, though this is not mandatory."

He said the provincial government would make land available for
the project.

Tenders for the first phase will close on March 31, and Mr Singh
expects to announce a successful bidder by the last week of May.

------------------------------------------------------------

ABB to export rail engines to India

NEW DELHI, Jan 16 (Reuter) - Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) will begin exporting
locomotives from its Zurich works to the Indian Railways in July, a company
official said.

"We are air-lifting the locomotives from Australia to Switzerland in view
of the tight delivery schedules," a top official of the Indian subsidiary of
ABB told Reuters.

This will mark the eventual conversion of Indian Railways to high powered
engines which can haul passenger and freight cars at an average 160 km an
hour, analysts said.

The mechanical parts are made by ABB's Australian subsidiary. The
electrical components are made in Switzerland, where the engines are assembled
and tested, the official said.

The Swiss electrical engineering group is to supply 33 locomotives to
Indian Railways as part of a $ 200 million order from Indian Railways which
includes technology transfer for local manufacture.

"This is ABB's first technology transfer anywhere in the world (outside
group firms)," the ABB official said.

ABB bagged the tender in 1993 against bids from Siemens AG, GEC Alsthom and
Sumitomo.

Construction of engines at ABB's Australian unit began after Indian
Railways approved the design, the official said.

Indian Railways, which makes around 150 electrical locomotives a year,
plans to phase out its 4,000 horsepower engines in favour of the 6,000
horsepower energy-efficient engines of ABB design which can run on existing
rails, the official said.

The engines will be manufactured at Indian Railway's Chittaranjan
Locomotive Works in the eastern state of West Bengal. It is currently
shortlisting Indian electrical component vendors.

The contract also allows Indian Railways to export these engines. Only
Indian Railways will have access to the new technology in Asia outside Japan,
he said.

"India can make them (engines) cheaper," the ABB official said. Indian
Railways recently bagged an order to export diesel locomotives to neighbouring
Bangladesh.

India has one of the world's largest rail systems with 62,500 route km, of
which 11,000 km is electrified.

In 1993, it ran 7,800 locomotives. Of these, 2,000 were electrical, 4,000
were diesel and 1,800 were steam-driven, according to Indian Railways.

From: S Pai <Pai>>

Subject: rail-fans

Date: 30 Jan 1995 17:09:00 -0500


This is an article from The Daily Telegraph of some days ago which I thought
might be worth posting here even though it doesn't have anything to do with
IR. I found it very interesting to read.

-Satish

------------------------------------------------------------

Headline: Chuff, chuff and bash, bash: Bill Powell joined a train-load of
steam buffs on a trip from Kiev to Sebastopol - and got between a 'gricer'
and his heart's desire

By Bill Powell

"Some people might think that I'd wasted my life," says Mike Hudson as the
maize fields of Moldova file past our carriage window in a haze of coal-smoke
and steam. "After all, I'm a 50-plus trainspotter who still lives with his mum
in Bognor!" In fact, Mike's appreciation of the value of time - like that of
many of his fellow enthusiasts - is finely tuned almost to the point of
obsession. It is all part of what is probably the grandest passion, after the
weather and angling, of the English-speaking world: railways. "Interest seems
to tail off the farther you go from the cradle of the Industrial Revolution,"
says Mike. "The French are more interested in food, and you just don't seem to
find any Italian trainspotters . . . of course it's very big in the old Brit
colonies."

I had fallen in with a train-load of British and Australian rail-buffs.
Night and day the corridors of our luxury special train, on its steam-hauled
progress from Kiev to Sebastopol and back, were astir with stop-watches and
time-tables and tales of heavy metal. These folk were dedicated "gricers" - a
term, apparently, based on the word "grouse" and signifying one who "bags"
things. They are an instructive lot and if the Russian engineers were thinking
of swapping engines - an FD20-2714 Nemirov-built 2-10-2 loco for one of the
equally old, equally scruffy TE 2-10-0s left behind in the German retreat of
the Second World War, say, - I was certainly going to find out all there was
to know about it.

It was catching, this virus. Soon I was slipping along to the bar of an
evening for two-bottle discussions on exotic gricer topics such as
de-clinkering procedures, slippage and momentum ratios on track gradients and
curing leaks in steam boilers with potatoes. I tutted with the best of them
over the loss to world civilisation of British steam-age punctuality (spot-on
to within a quarter of a minute, apparently). Before long I, too, fretted at
yet another unexplained halt in some nameless ex-Soviet marshalling yard. I
quietly pooh-poohed the official Russian assurance that the next type of
engine put on would prove more serviceable than the last. I was to be heard
speculating about the sort of bribe our trip organiser was having to employ to
help local railway bosses remember where they kept the keys to their
water-towers. Over warm Crimean champagne I demanded to know why we weren't
heroically on schedule like those tatty Moscow expresses squealing past in the
opposite direction.

Mike Hudson looked glumly at the bar's kitsch clock - in the form of a
giant Rolex watch - and revealed that wonky schedules were messing up his
plans: "I'm what they call a steam track-basher, which means that for me the
whole point of coming on a trip like this is to observe the route. "So long as
we are moving, under steam, in daylight, I can draw a red line on the map
which means I've 'done' that particular stretch . . . at night I have to make
a dotted line which I hope to convert to a red line on the way back." Hang on,
let's get this straight, I thought. You have actually to see the track
unfolding beneath the train? Correct. There were enthusiasts for every aspect
of railwayana, said Mike. Some were devoted to cataloguing all those dismal
little cast-iron wotsits you see beside the tracks. Some were rounding up
every last rivet pattern around the world. Others felt the urge to eavesdrop
with stereo sound recorders on assignations between engines and viaducts
. . . and there were those who awaited with their camcorders the fusion of sun
angle, smoke direction and track curvature in one climactic train-filled
"glint" shot.

But track-bashing is probably as close as anyone could come to a pure,
unencumbered rail experience. Such philosophising was all very well but
wouldn't it need a team of Jesuits to figure out the minimum light conditions
necessary to "see" a rail journey? And wouldn't Mike's dawn-to-dusk red line
on the map be compromised by, for instance, a visit to the loo? "We say that
being able to distinguish the colour of grass constitutes acceptable red-line
conditions," said Mike, "although we still haven't resolved the difficult
matter of moonlight. And as for calls of nature, I usually wait until the
terrain is right - where I have a good far-ahead view." Mike has been through
Peru's railway system a couple of times without ever finding time to visit the
ruins of Machu Picchu, "but I did manage to fit in the Taj Mahal once when I
was track-bashing in India. It's a matter of luck - track comes before
tourism, steam before stomach."

For rail enthusiasts of all persuasions, it's the journey alone that
matters. Quite a few that I spoke to on the Crimea Express had only a passing
interest (literally) in what life was like beyond the world's rail networks.
Mike Hudson - his regrettable snub to Inca architecture notwithstanding - is a
notable exception. Not for him the hit-and-run gricing of Petey the Aussie
number-cruncher, who told me: "Get the serial-numbers and run, that's the
ticket . . . the world's our olive, mate, and we're out to stuff it." Although
he doesn't readily admit it, Mike can get by in most European languages. And
he turned out to be a reliable source of background information on the
ex-Soviet lands we were steaming through. Throughout nearly all of his working
life, starting as a ticket clerk at Barnham Junction until early retirement
this year from the Passenger Train Running Section at Redhill, Mike has
managed to fit in five two-week track-bashing trips every year, seeking out
steam routes wherever time and money would allow. Last year he went to
Germany, Austria, Switzerland, France, Belgium, Italy and southern Poland. In
winter, Mike looks farther afield - to South America, the Philippines, India:
wherever steam engines still chuff. "Maybe I'll go back to New Zealand - and
I've always meant to look at the old French lines in Africa."

Mike's unobtrusive style contrasted with some of the videoing-frenzies that
went on when our train made one of its run-bys. We would stop in some
picturesque spot where camcorder brigades could de-train and set up, while the
engine retreated down the line before returning in a roar-past. Then it was
woe betide anyone who got between gricers and their hearts' desires or, as in
my case, inadvertently made some recordable aside. Anxiously fiddling with
their equipment, our video-ers held their breath as engine 16194 (a
Voroshilograd-built LVOO62 2-10-2, if you must know) puffed itself up in a
theatrical cloud of steam and smoke and charged, wailing in an Armageddon
crescendo. In a cigarette-break afterglow we waited for the train to compose
itself again. Petey from Ballarat was not best pleased. "Very funny. Now it's
on my tape - some drongo saying the earth was moving for him," he fumed. Mike
said I was lucky to be allowed back on board.

From: S Pai <Pai>>

Subject: new version of Palace on Wheels

Date: 01 Feb 1995 23:51:00 -0500


[From an article in soc.culture.indian. -Satish]

South China Morning Post, January 26, 1995

Headline: Royal Orient chuffs into world of fantasy

By TIM METCALFE

India's answer to the Oriental Express is taking to the tracks with a
fresh image and a new itinerary from next week, steaming beyond the deserts of
Rajasthan into Gujarat.

Known for years as the "Palace on Wheels", the luxury train service has
been re-named The Royal Orient as it switches to broad-gauge track.

The train is also under new management. Gujarat Tourism is taking over
from Rajasthan Tourism to run the service in collaboration with Indian
Railways.

Though not steeped in intrigue like its European cousin, which inspired an
Agatha Christie novel, The Royal Orient is nevertheless a journey into a world
of legend and fantasy.

The state carriages and saloons were once the exclusive domain of former
maharajas and India's best-equipped train even boasts its own postmark.

This fantasy begins with a red-carpet welcome at Delhi Cantonment Station
as guests embark at 2.30 pm sharp for a seven-day journey into a region of
India steeped in history.

"The idea is to travel by night and sight-see by day," said a spokesman
for The Royal Orient.

So, on the first morning, the train, which can accommodate just 104 guests
in 52 cabins, steams into Udaipur, the city of lakes, for a guided tour of the
enchanting marble palaces of Jag Mandir and Jag Niwas, which appear to float
in the middle of Lake Pichola and is today the Lake Palace Hotel.

On the second day, The Royal Orient reaches Palitana in Gujarat, the first
stage of the new itinerary where the hills are covered with 863 Jain temples
dating back almost 1,000 years.

Next it is on to Somnath, famous for its temple built by Soma, the Moon
God,to mark the creation of the universe, before continuing onwards to the
metropolis of Ahmedabad, with its walled city of dazzlingly-colourful stores.

Midway through the itinerary, the train takes a diversion to the ethnic
beach resort of Mandvi before heading back north to Delhi via Sasangir, the
"pink city" of Jaipur and the magnificent hill fort of Amber.

Equipped like a five-star hotel, there are 13 saloons aboard The Royal
Orient with video screens in all of them and dining cars offering a choice
between European and Indian cuisine.

The lounge car has a bar, smoking room and library where passengers can
relax.

The package for double occupancy costs from US$ 150-$ 200 a day, depending
on the season. This includes the cabin and meals and all sightseeing and
special events.

Further details from The Royal Orient, Bikaner House, Pandara Road, New
Delhi (Tel: 381884. Fax: 011-382823).

GRAPHIC: Camel train . . . a scene typical of those that passengers aboard The
Royal Orient, known as the Palace on Wheels, can expect to see during their
trip.

From: S Pai <Pai>>

Subject: another article on Bangalore LRT

Date: 01 Feb 1995 23:54:00 -0500


[From soc.culture.indian. -Satish]

New rail system for Bangalore

Source: Press Trust of India news agency, New Delhi

Global tenders were to be floated on 16th January for a 42bn rupee
four-phase Light Rail Transit (LRT) project for Bangalore city, PTI news
agency reported. The project would be implemented by the Karnataka
government, joining hands with selected Indian and international consortia who
would sink funds into it. A newly floated company, Bangalore Mass Rapid System
Ltd (BMRTL), is to implement the project, and actual work would start in April
1997, with the first phase expected to be completed in 2000. The LRT system
would consist of electric air-conditioned trains running at an average speed of
about 36 to 40 km an hour on elevated viaducts about 20 ft above road level.

The initial franchise would be for 30 years which might, after
negotiations, be extended for a further 20 years. A total track length of 90
km was envisaged.

From: Dheeraj Sanghi <dheeraj@iitk.email

Subject: Re: new version of Palace on Wheels

Date: 03 Feb 1995 04:00:00 -0500


> Known for years as the "Palace on Wheels", the luxury train service has
> been re-named The Royal Orient as it switches to broad-gauge track.

I thought it was not very clear that it is the "Palace on Wheels"
which is becoming the broad gauge train from next September. The rake
which was used for Palace on Wheels so far (the MG rake) has now been
redesigned (Gujarati ambience rather than Rajasthani), and is being
used for the Royal Orient. The change of name was necessary since
Rajasthan Tourism is keen on retaining the earlier name for the BG
version which will start next September.

-dheeraj

From: Dheeraj Sanghi <dheeraj@iitk.email

Subject: Re: another article on Bangalore LRT

Date: 03 Feb 1995 04:03:00 -0500


> New rail system for Bangalore

> Global tenders were to be floated on 16th January for a 42bn rupee
> four-phase Light Rail Transit (LRT) project for Bangalore city,

According to Economic Times of last week, there is a plan to have
MRTS in some 25+ cities. The Delhi tenders were floated last year,
with the deadline of Jan 31st, but has now been extended till Mar
31st. It seems that a very large number of MNCs are interested.

-dheeraj

From: Dheeraj Sanghi <dheeraj@iitk.email

Subject: New Shatabdi

Date: 03 Feb 1995 04:43:00 -0500


New Delhi - Dehradun
6 days a week (except Wed)
7 ACC + 1 Executive class coaches (seems like standard for all Shatabdis)

2017 UP Timings 2018 DN

06:00 D New Delhi A 22:05
09:00 A Saharanpur D 19:15
09:20 D A 18:55
10:30 A Haridwar D 17:25
10:35 D A 17:20
11:45 A Dehradun D 16:20

Fare:

Stations ACC Ex.
New Delhi - Dehradun 300 600
New Delhi - Haridwar 270 540
New Delhi - Saharanpur 230 460
Saharanpur - Haridwar 125 250
Saharanpur - Dehradun 190 380

Questions:

Why is there 20 minute halt at Saharanpur ?
Can one buy a Haridwar - Dehradun ticket ?
The fare difference from New Delhi to the
three stations seems too low.

-dheeraj

From: Dheeraj Sanghi <dheeraj@iitk.email

Subject: New Delhi Chandigarh Shatabdi rescheduled.

Date: 03 Feb 1995 04:48:00 -0500


Train No. 2011 Timing Train No. 2012
Present Revised Present Revised
10:20 AM DEP 07:30 AM New Delhi 04:45 PM ARR 03:35 PM
01:10 PM ARR 10:35 AM Chandigarh 01:40 PM DEP 12:40 PM

It seems to me that they have got a separate rake for this
Shatabdi. Earlier, Shatabdis to Kalka and Chandigarh used to
share the rake. There was very little time between the two
trains, so if one train is late, there was no scope of covering
up. There were lots of complaints, and in fact, it was announced
that Chandigarh Shatanbdi will be cancelled. But now, they have
probably got another rake which will be used only for 6 hours
in a day.

-dheeraj

From: Dheeraj Sanghi <dheeraj@iitk.email

Subject: Lucknow Shatabdi

Date: 03 Feb 1995 04:52:00 -0500


The Lko shatabdi has been made daily.
They are now trying to make all Shatabdis daily.
(Those which start from NDLS at least.)

They have the following Shatabdis:
Bhopal, Lucknow, Kalka, Chandigarh, Amritsar, Jaipur, Dehradun.

They probably have 8 rakes, so that one rake can be
maintained every 8th day, and still allow all Shatabdis
to be daily. Since all Shatabdis have standardized rakes,
switching rakes is not a problem.

-dheeraj

From: Pushkar Apte <apte@spdc.email

Subject: Private Train Operations

Date: 02 Feb 1995 12:44:00 -0500


NEW DELHI, Feb 2 (Reuter) - India authorised three companies
to run trains on popular tourist circuits, opening up its
closely held railway network to the private sector, the Press
Trust of India (PTI) said on Thursday.
The Railway Ministry cleared proposals by East West
Airlines, Sterling Holiday Resorts and the Patil Group in
association with the London-based Orient Express Group to
operate trains on four circuits, PTI said.
India's railways have historically been state run.
Three of the circuits will link major cities and tourists
sites in southern India, while a fourth, operated by Sterling
Holiday, will run between Delhi, Jaipur, Agra, Khajuraho,
Varanasi and Lucknow in the north, it said.

From: S. Kumar <kumar@qm.email

Subject: Delhi-Jaipur line

Date: 02 Feb 1995 13:03:00 -0500


Has this section been fully converted to BG? Dheeraj seemed to imply
that the Delhi-Jaipur Shatabdi is running. If so what are its
timings? What has happened to the Pink City express?

Kumar

From: Dheeraj Sanghi <dheeraj@iitk.email

Subject: Re: Delhi-Jaipur line

Date: 04 Feb 1995 04:22:00 -0500


> Has this section been fully converted to BG? Dheeraj seemed to imply
> that the Delhi-Jaipur Shatabdi is running. If so what are its
> timings? What has happened to the Pink City express?

Jaipur-Delhi line has been converted to BG (the main route via
Alwar). There are not many trains on this yet though. I think
there is only Shatabdi, and one more train on this track.
Pink City goes via MG route. Delhi Sarai Rohilla - Rewari -
Ringus - Jaipur.

I have forgotten the exact timings, but it starts from NDLS at
6:00 or so in the morning, and takes 4 hours 45 minutes or may be
a few minutes less. It returns back to NDLS around 10:00 PM.
It runs 6 days a week. I think it does not run on Tuesdays.

-dheeraj

From: Pushkar Apte <apte@spdc.email

Subject: Dlehi-Jaipur

Date: 03 Feb 1995 08:40:00 -0500


Sorry about the previous message, which chose to take off
pre-maturely :-). As I was saying, thanks, Dheeraj, for the info in re:
Delhi-Jaipur Shatabdi. I was not aware that the Delhi-Jaipur BG line
is already complete. Does anyone know if any other sections of the
Delhi-Ahmadabad MG line have been completed? And do the MG trains
like Delhi Mail, Ashram Exp. etc. terminate @ Delhi Sarai Rohilla?

Regards,
Pushkar
-------

From: acha <acha@cs.email

Subject: MG trains from Delhi

Date: 03 Feb 1995 12:15:00 -0500


All MG trains fromm Delhi now terminate at Sarai Rohilla. The times are
more or less the same as before. There are plans to move the
MG terminus to Gurgaon and then to Rewari.

With the conversion of the Delhi-Jaipur route, there is (at least) one
train from Jaipur to Howrah. I think what used to be the Upper India
Express.

anurag

From: Dheeraj Sanghi <dheeraj@iitk.email

Subject: Re: Dlehi-Jaipur

Date: 04 Feb 1995 12:26:00 -0500


No other part of the line seems to be complete. All trains
mentioned take the MG route and terminate at DEE.

-dheeraj

The content of the individual messages displayed here is subject to copyright by the original authors and may not be reproduced outside the context of IRFCA without permission.
Note: This site is not officially affiliated with Indian Railways! The official web site of Indian Railways is: http://www.indianrailways.gov.in
Site contact: webmaster@irfca.org
Copyright © 2010, IRFCA.org. About IRFCA  Contact Us  Search this site  Site Map  Links   Acknowledgements  Legal Information & Disclaimers