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From: Vijay Balasubramanian <>

Subject: Re: Cattle guard.

Date: 11 Oct 1999 08:16:18 -0500


Isn't cow-catcher the same as cattle guard? Is this term used
exclusively
on IR or
on other railways as well?

Vijay

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Apurva Bahadur [SMTP:iti@vsnl.email
> Sent: Monday, October 11, 1999 2:47 AM
> To: clzeni@mindspring.email
> Cc: irfca@cs.email
> Subject: Cattle guard.
>
> > Snowplows are ordered on all new US power, regardless of where it
will
> > be operating. Primary reason is that the plow helps shunt the
vehicles
> > of idiot motorists out of the way, helping keep the vehicle from
getting
> > under the loco and derailing the train. Keeps the train crew from
being
> > injured due to the actions of fools who try to beat the train to a
level
> > crossing.
>
> In India the danger is really the cattle that can jam under the
locomotive
> severely damaging
> the underframe. Actually the solid cattle guard / snow plow (in the
> tropical heat !) must be
> an afterthought. The strip type item invariably gets damaged when
> confronted with cattle. So
> a solid item stands greater chance of remaining intact.
> Please note the presence of a 'stone guard' which hangs below the
cattle
> guard, hopefully
> clearing the rail of smaller obstacles before they come under the
wheels.
> The drivers
> religiously check the clearance of this stone guard and the rail
before
> accepting the loco
> at the shed.
> The loco often becomes immobilized as the brake pipes also get
damaged.
> However I saw a picture of a 'new' WCM 5 (picture dated 1963) and that
had
> a solid cattle
> guard.
>
> Apurva
>
>

From: Vijay Balasubramanian <>

Subject: Re: Fastest train

Date: 11 Oct 1999 08:19:38 -0500


The fastest trains in India are the New Delhi - Bhopal / Lucknow
Shatabdi
Exps. with a max. speed of 140 kmph. The Bhopal Shatabdi can achieve
this
speed in the Faridabad-Agra Cantt stretch. In what section does the LKO
Shatabdi have a 140 kmph. max. permissible speed?

Please refer to the trivia section of the FAQ site put up by Satish -
<A HREF="http://meltingpot.fortunecity.com/syria/716">http://meltingpot.fortunecity.com/syria/716</A> - for further details.

Vijay
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Nagaraj Mandya Kanchi [SMTP:nmandya@in.email
> Sent: Friday, October 08, 1999 9:36 PM
> To: irfca@cs.email
> Subject: Fastest train
>
> Hi,
> My name is Nagaraj and I recently joined the list. I have always
> wondered which train would be the fastest train in India and also, how
> much would its maximum speed be?
> Also, what are the advantages/disadvantages of the diesel
powered
> engine compared to the electric engines?
> --
> Regards,
> Nagaraj

From: Shohei HARA <>

Subject: sorry

Date: 11 Oct 1999 09:15:40 -0500


By mistake, I have sent some message in Japanese format to this mailing
list.

Please accept my apolgies.

Regards,

===============================
Shohei HARA (Mr) (? ??)
<harasho@gol.email
<<A HREF="http://www2.gol.com/users/harasho>">http://www2.gol.com/users/harasho></A> :??????????!

From: S.Shankar <>

Subject: Re: Newpaper scrapbook

Date: 11 Oct 1999 10:12:48 -0500


Hello Appu,
There are two reasons for my incorporating newspaper cuttings into my
webpages:
1. As I live outside India, and visit only once in two years or so, I
end up accummulating more clippings than actual photographs.
In the end, I find that I have all the info required for the webpage in
the form of clippings, to supplement the pics I've already taken. Rather
that wait another two years till my next trip home,(then also I might
not be able to cover all the aspects, due to pressures from home (you
are coming after two years, why do you want to keep roaming around etc.,
I prefer to use the clippings instead.
2.Second, it serves to complete the page. If I stuck to a rigid 'only my
photos' policy, I'll end up hosting incomplete pages.

Your clippings page is a terrific idea. I might pinch the idea sometime
later on, to use up all the remaining pics I have. I'm toying between
that and an NRM site. I have so many pics of the nrm that the site will
be larger than my superrailway site. I'm putting off making it as we
already have three nrm sites: the official one, the rediff one, and
another I spotted while browsing. (I've not bookmarked it).

I might make a clipping page myself. You might also include news
articles. I had three journals full of them: I dumped all of them when I
went online. :-(

Only, why start with an accident? I'd generally prefer to avoid
depictions of situations involving loss of life or property.Lets depict
the more cheerful aspects, what do you say?

Cheers.



Apurva Bahadur wrote:
>
> Gang !
>
> Taking cue from what Shankar is doing, I have resolved to put on the
web
> as many pics of IR that can be found in the newspaper and the mags
that
> I come across. Starting with the pic of an accident - the derailment
of
> an EMU rake at Badlapur.
> Go to
> <A HREF="http://members.tripod.com/~ApuB/index.htm">http://members.tripod.com/~ApuB/index.htm</A>
> and click on the 'IR in the newspapers and mags' link at the end.
>
> Apurva

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Re: Diesel Crane spotted

Date: 11 Oct 1999 10:18:21 -0500


>
> Is it possible that this loco is in lack of operating controls and
must
> be M-UED to another as a trailing unit? This would make it a"B" unit.
> It could be a designation for the rear of the loco. "A" for front and
> "B" for rear. Just a thought.

Nothing like that on the IR. ALL diesels can be MUed. This one had the
the MU plug. A
quick mail to the IRFCA members who are with the DLW should solve the
mystery.

Apurva

From: Jishnu Mukerji <>

Subject: Re: Thames Turbo ?

Date: 11 Oct 1999 10:54:44 -0500


Apurva Bahadur wrote:
>
> > It is more than just the coroners that they are waiting for. Coach H
was in an
> > unstable condition and was deemed to be dangerous to enter.
>
> Here too the instructions on the IR are quite clear - topple the
carriage and clear
> the line first.

Well then (regrettably for IR), it appears that the British have a
policy that
lays greater stress on recovery of bodies and thorough investigation of
accidents than IR apepars to do, according to information that you
present. Note
that the assessment presented in the previous sentence is purely based
on
information presented here about IR, and observed behavior of the
British in the
aftermath of the Ladbroke Grove crash. I just dearly hope that in
reality IR is
not as callous as it is being made to appear.

> The ghat sections (where derailments are frequent) are littered with
> toppled wagons by the side of the track. The wrecks lie there for many
years before
> any attempt is made salvage the rakes. The tracks are too busy to stop
the traffic to
> recover these fallen vehicles. I think the BR was caught napping about
the
> possibility of such an accident.

It appears that once the site of the accident was declared a crime
scene, no
amount of cranes at the location would have been allowed to move
anything until
the criminal investigation, which includes the coroner's work, was
completed.
Appearently, it is only today (Monday) that they have arrived at that
point, and
the last carriage will be moved today. The cranes have been working on
other
parts of the wreck for the last several days.

It should also be pointed out that derailments of goods trains in the
Ghats is
very different from a serious collision between two passenger trains in
the
middle of a city neighborhood, next to the Eurostar maintenance area at
North
Pole, with nowhere to topple anything. (BTW, why are derailments so
frequent?
The Swiss seem to run a railway with track alignments that are at least
as
difficult as in the Ghats, say on the St. Gotthard line, and they don't
seem to
suffer from frequent, or as a matter of fact, hardly any, derailments?
What
gives?)

It will be a few days before service is restored through that area. It
was also
reported that the total death toll will be between 30 and 40, perhaps
closer to
30 than 40.

Also, there is going to be a serious shakeup of the rail safety regime,
with a
high likelyhood that the rail safety and standards role that Railtrack
owns may
be removed from them and a new independant body created to oversee rail
safety
and standards.

Jishnu.


Jishnu.

From: Tim & Anita Wakeman <>

Subject: Re: Diesel - Electric ?

Date: 11 Oct 1999 10:57:35 -0500


Apurva,

It is a GE E-44. It was built for electric and generates 4400hp. There
was also a smaller version of this, the E-33. I was aching
to get to Pennsylvannia to photograph these beast, but at the time I had
to depend on others for transportation. Tried to get a friend to go
once, but he was not interested in "juice" at the time. NOW he wished we
had gone. Of, course there are not any of these left except as static
displays.

regards, Tim

Apurva Bahadur wrote:
>
> Gang !
>
> Check out the picture of a Diesel Electric loco which has been
converted
> for pure electric operation by adding a panto.
> <A HREF="http://www.560.simplenet.com/html/pc_photos_7.html">http://www.560.simplenet.com/html/pc_photos_7.html</A>
> Any details on this power ? Must be a to beat the noise and smoke
> pollution laws in the US. Was the diesel prime mover removed totally ?
> Or is this an electro - diesel ?
>
> Apurva

From: Tim & Anita Wakeman <>

Subject: Re: Diesel Crane spotted

Date: 11 Oct 1999 11:05:21 -0500


Apurva Bahadur wrote:

> Also spotted Kazipet WDM 2B # 16714. This loco looked wet (it has
rained
> hard quite recently), but even after sometime it still looked wet, on
a
> closer inspection I saw that the entire carbody, roof and the cab
sides
> were coated with a layer of oil ! What is 'B' about this WDM 2,not


Is it possible that this loco is in lack of operating controls and must
be M-UED to another as a trailing unit? This would make it a"B" unit.
It could be a designation for the rear of the loco. "A" for front and
"B" for rear. Just a thought.

Tim

From: Jishnu Mukerji <>

Subject: Re: Thames Turbo ?

Date: 11 Oct 1999 11:10:39 -0500


For a very good rundown on the Paddington (Ladbroke Grove) crash see the
URL:

<A HREF="http://freespace.virgin.net/neil.worthington/padfaq.htm">http://freespace.virgin.net/neil.worthington/padfaq.htm</A>

Specially see the Interim Report from HMRI at:

<A HREF="http://www.open.gov.uk/hse/railway/paddrail/interim.htm">http://www.open.gov.uk/hse/railway/paddrail/interim.htm</A>

Also you can see the track layout at:

<A HREF="http://www.open.gov.uk/hse/railway/paddrail/pad_map.htm">http://www.open.gov.uk/hse/railway/paddrail/pad_map.htm</A>

Regards,

Jishnu.

From: Jishnu Mukerji <>

Subject: Re: Diesel - Electric ?

Date: 11 Oct 1999 11:18:10 -0500


Tim & Anita Wakeman wrote:
>
> Apurva,
>
> It is a GE E-44. It was built for electric and generates 4400hp. There
> was also a smaller version of this, the E-33. I was aching
> to get to Pennsylvannia to photograph these beast, but at the time I
had
> to depend on others for transportation. Tried to get a friend to go
> once, but he was not interested in "juice" at the time. NOW he wished
we
> had gone. Of, course there are not any of these left except as static
> displays.

All old AC electric locomotives have been decommisioned in the USA
because of
problem with PCBs in their transformers. Among them are the E44s and
E33s. At
one point Amtrak acquired a bunch of them from Conrail, but they were
ventually
deemed to be too expensive to fix up, and have never seen service. The
GG-1s
also suffered from this problem (among others). There is a yard near
South Amboy
NJ where GG-1s were parked overnight and minor servicing was done on
them. This
area is now fenced off with skull and crossbones signs all around, and
it is
deemed to be a toxic waste site awaiting cleanup. Other shed areas have
been
cleaned up by removing significant portion of topsoil from around the
tracks.

> Apurva Bahadur wrote:
> >
> > Gang !
> >
> > Check out the picture of a Diesel Electric loco which has been
converted
> > for pure electric operation by adding a panto.
> > <A HREF="http://www.560.simplenet.com/html/pc_photos_7.html">http://www.560.simplenet.com/html/pc_photos_7.html</A>
> > Any details on this power ? Must be a to beat the noise and smoke
> > pollution laws in the US. Was the diesel prime mover removed totally
?

They never had diesel prime movers. They were originally built as
electrics.

> > Or is this an electro - diesel ?

Jishnu.

From: Tim & Anita Wakeman <>

Subject: Re: Cattle guard.

Date: 11 Oct 1999 12:05:59 -0500


Vijay Balasubramanian wrote:
>
> Isn't cow-catcher the same as cattle guard? Is this term used
exclusively
> on IR or
> on other railways as well?
>
> Vijay

Actually a "cattle guard" Are the fences that are put up near railway
crossings. It usually starts high on the outer side of the tracks then
goes to a point in the ground near the ties. There are sometimes a steel
grate in the ground at the location. This is supposed to keep cattle
from wandering out onto the tracks.

Regards, Tim
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Apurva Bahadur [SMTP:iti@vsnl.email
> > Sent: Monday, October 11, 1999 2:47 AM
> > To: clzeni@mindspring.email
> > Cc: irfca@cs.email
> > Subject: Cattle guard.
> >
> > > Snowplows are ordered on all new US power, regardless of where it
will
> > > be operating. Primary reason is that the plow helps shunt the
vehicles
> > > of idiot motorists out of the way, helping keep the vehicle from
getting
> > > under the loco and derailing the train. Keeps the train crew from
being
> > > injured due to the actions of fools who try to beat the train to a
level
> > > crossing.
> >
> > In India the danger is really the cattle that can jam under the
locomotive
> > severely damaging
> > the underframe. Actually the solid cattle guard / snow plow (in the
> > tropical heat !) must be
> > an afterthought. The strip type item invariably gets damaged when
> > confronted with cattle. So
> > a solid item stands greater chance of remaining intact.
> > Please note the presence of a 'stone guard' which hangs below the
cattle
> > guard, hopefully
> > clearing the rail of smaller obstacles before they come under the
wheels.
> > The drivers
> > religiously check the clearance of this stone guard and the rail
before
> > accepting the loco
> > at the shed.
> > The loco often becomes immobilized as the brake pipes also get
damaged.
> > However I saw a picture of a 'new' WCM 5 (picture dated 1963) and
that had
> > a solid cattle
> > guard.
> >
> > Apurva
> >
> >

From: Iain A Fraser <>

Subject: Re: BOOK

Date: 11 Oct 1999 12:48:23 -0500


Hi

The book will be the "Great Railway Bazaar" by Paul Theroux. It is
currently available as a Penguin paperback as are all the Theroux
railway books (The Red Rooster... about China and Old Patagonian
Express ..South American Railways IIRC)

They are all non fiction travel writings although the knowledgeable
railway enthusiast will detect some writers license to help the story
along......
Cheers

Iain
Aerolite Booktraders(UK)
Railway Book Specialists
<A HREF="http://www.aerolite.u-net.com">http://www.aerolite.u-net.com</A>

From: Iain A Fraser <>

Subject: Re: Sri Lanka

Date: 11 Oct 1999 13:05:55 -0500


Hi

Thanks to the folks who pointed me in directions for information.

A question.....Adams Bridge???
On some maps its shown as a rail link from Sri Lanka to the SIR
system in India. Others it appears as a ferry. The line on the IR
side sems to be connected to the metre gauge system whilst that on
the SL side must be 5-6......Im very curious!!! Can anyone tell me
anything about it? Was it a wartime feature for example?

Cheers

Iain

Aerolite Booktraders(UK)
Railway Book Specialists
<A HREF="http://www.aerolite.u-net.com">http://www.aerolite.u-net.com</A>

From: S.Shankar <>

Subject: Re: Newpaper scrapbook

Date: 11 Oct 1999 13:12:51 -0500


Hello Apppu,
Regarding your newspaper scrapbook project.
The accident pic gives me another idea.
How about an IR news page?
All of us fellow members could be your correspondents.
Hence your newspaper scrapbook will be divided into two parts: one a
general scrapbook: limited to pictures alone. Even tiny news bits about
railways can be included. At times, you can digress from pics, and
include juicy articles that appear in the papers off and on: history of
the DQ, writeup about the decline of steam, articles like 'trains that
whistled in the night', the article about motormen, things like that. I
used to maintain all such snippets in three journals, which I dumped
unceremoniously. I kick myself for that now. YOu can kick me as well,
when I come to Poona next July. You'll be surprised how soon this fills
up.
The second part, the news section, can cover accidents, derailments, new
rolling stock recently received, new train inaugrations, holiday special
announcements etc. etc. Things of short tern relevance only.
There is of course a very thin line of distinction at times about what
goes into the scrapbook and what goes into the news section.
Lets have a separate IR news wing.Long live the irfca.
Cheers.
Shankar




Apurva Bahadur wrote:
>
> Gang !
>
> Taking cue from what Shankar is doing, I have resolved to put on the
web
> as many pics of IR that can be found in the newspaper and the mags
that
> I come across. Starting with the pic of an accident - the derailment
of
> an EMU rake at Badlapur.
> Go to
> <A HREF="http://members.tripod.com/~ApuB/index.htm">http://members.tripod.com/~ApuB/index.htm</A>
> and click on the 'IR in the newspapers and mags' link at the end.
>
> Apurva

From: S.Shankar <>

Subject: Re: Diesel Crane spotted

Date: 11 Oct 1999 13:24:22 -0500


Hello Tim,
Sorry for butting in, but I do not believe the concept of 'A' unit and
'B' unit exists on the IR.
No doubt the earliest WDM/1s were 'A' units, but they IR treats them
like standard diesels, thats all. I still remember, when these beasts
used to be run in multiple,(e.g. with the Howrah-Madras Mail), they were
simply coupled one after the other (both units facing the same
direction). For all you know, the engines might have returned
individually, hauling two different trains, with a WDM/2 or 4 hauling
the Mail on its return journey!

I've just been leafing through Daboo's book.
I find a mention there that while the WDM/2As were dual braked engines,
WDM/2Bs were straight air-braked.
(In that case were the twin Rajdhani's engines 2Bs? Think not. This
seems to be a more recent concept.)
Hence, from what I can understand,
WDM/2: Conventional vacuum brake only
WDM/2A: Dual brake
WDM/2B: Air brake.

That still does not explain how the baldie is WDM/2C, and the prototype
WDM/2R.
Such is the complexity of IR classification for you. Of course, as IR
freaks, how can we possible stop at the simpler aspects?
Cheers.
Shankar



Tim & Anita Wakeman wrote:
>
> Apurva Bahadur wrote:
> >
> > >
> > > Is it possible that this loco is in lack of operating controls and
must
> > > be M-UED to another as a trailing unit? This would make it a"B"
unit.
> > > It could be a designation for the rear of the loco. "A" for front
and
> > > "B" for rear. Just a thought.
> >
> > Nothing like that on the IR. ALL diesels can be MUed. This one had
the the MU plug. A
> > quick mail to the IRFCA members who are with the DLW should solve
the mystery.
> >
> > Apurva
>
> Yes Apurva, it would have MU capabilities, that is what I said, But
can
> it operate in the lead?
>
> Tim

From: S.Shankar <>

Subject: Re: Sri Lanka

Date: 11 Oct 1999 13:38:53 -0500


Hello,
I'm still very hazy about this, but I remember what my late grandfather
used to tell me as a kid: he used to travel to Ceylon off and on in his
capacity of Dy. Supdt of Postal Services, while investigating an
embezzlement case.
In those days, the Rameswaram Express (mg) used to be called Boat mail,
as it used to connect to the ferry at a place called Danushkodi, which
is even further South from Rameswaram.
Passenger used to take the ferry to Ceylon, and then catch the Ceylonese
train from there, preseumably bg.
I do not think a rail link actually existed between the two countries.
The bridge over the sea might have been too long: several km long. I do
not think that kind of technology existed in those days.
Hindu Mythology, notably the Ramayana talks of a legendary bridge built
between India and Ceylon by Ram's croonies in a bid to rescue his
kidnapped wife Sita. Some say remnants of that bridge still exist. In
that case, Adam's bridge is a very Brit name!!
Anyway, although of academic interest, I do not think you will be using
that route any more. That ferry service has long been suspended thanks
to the band of terrorists who operate in that area who go by the name of
LTTE or Tamil Tigers. Plus the illegal infiltration of several of these
terrorists into Tamil Nad in India, plus of course the refugees, fleeing
from all the terrorism.
I do not think ferry services have been resumed yet. South India
residents, any news on this?
Cheers.
Shankar


Iain A Fraser wrote:
>
> Hi
>
> Thanks to the folks who pointed me in directions for information.
>
> A question.....Adams Bridge???
> On some maps its shown as a rail link from Sri Lanka to the SIR
> system in India. Others it appears as a ferry. The line on the IR
> side sems to be connected to the metre gauge system whilst that on
> the SL side must be 5-6......Im very curious!!! Can anyone tell me
> anything about it? Was it a wartime feature for example?
>
> Cheers
>
> Iain
>
> Aerolite Booktraders(UK)
> Railway Book Specialists
> <A HREF="http://www.aerolite.u-net.com">http://www.aerolite.u-net.com</A>

From: C. Zeni <>

Subject: B units was Re: Diesel Crane spotted

Date: 11 Oct 1999 13:54:40 -0500


S.Shankar wrote:
>
> Hello Tim,
> Sorry for butting in, but I do not believe the concept of 'A' unit and
> 'B' unit exists on the IR.
> No doubt the earliest WDM/1s were 'A' units, but they IR treats them
> like standard diesels, thats all. I still remember, when these beasts
> used to be run in multiple,(e.g. with the Howrah-Madras Mail), they
were
> simply coupled one after the other (both units facing the same
> direction). For all you know, the engines might have returned
> individually, hauling two different trains, with a WDM/2 or 4 hauling
> the Mail on its return journey!
>
> I've just been leafing through Daboo's book.
> I find a mention there that while the WDM/2As were dual braked
engines,
> WDM/2Bs were straight air-braked.
> (In that case were the twin Rajdhani's engines 2Bs? Think not. This
> seems to be a more recent concept.)
> Hence, from what I can understand,
> WDM/2: Conventional vacuum brake only
> WDM/2A: Dual brake
> WDM/2B: Air brake.
>
> That still does not explain how the baldie is WDM/2C, and the
prototype
> WDM/2R.
> Such is the complexity of IR classification for you. Of course, as IR
> freaks, how can we possible stop at the simpler aspects?

This all begs the question of a foreigner - were there ever B units on
IR, that it, non-cab equipped diesels used as "booster" units in MU with
cabbed units?

Point of trivia - the American B units *do* have control stands in them,
but are used only by the hostler - the guy at the loco shed that moves
the units around - to assemble locomotive consists. The stands are
either by the end door of the unit or, in some cases, by a window so
that the hostler stands inside the unit and sticks his head out to see
where he's going.
--
Craig Zeni - REPLY TO -->> clzeni at mindspring dot com
<A HREF="http://www.mindspring.com/~clzeni/index.html">http://www.mindspring.com/~clzeni/index.html</A>

When I read about the evils of drinking,
I gave up reading. - Henny Youngman

From: Tim & Anita Wakeman <>

Subject: Re: Diesel Crane spotted

Date: 11 Oct 1999 15:37:51 -0500


Apurva Bahadur wrote:
>
> >
> > Is it possible that this loco is in lack of operating controls and
must
> > be M-UED to another as a trailing unit? This would make it a"B"
unit.
> > It could be a designation for the rear of the loco. "A" for front
and
> > "B" for rear. Just a thought.
>
> Nothing like that on the IR. ALL diesels can be MUed. This one had the
the MU plug. A
> quick mail to the IRFCA members who are with the DLW should solve the
mystery.
>
> Apurva


Yes Apurva, it would have MU capabilities, that is what I said, But can
it operate in the lead?

Tim

From: Iain A Fraser <>

Subject: Re: Sri Lanka

Date: 11 Oct 1999 15:55:33 -0500


Shankar.......

Thanks for your most intresting reply.....I doubted that a physical
link would have been built for the reasons you state. The railway
gauges of course dont match. The name Adams Bridge threw me though
hence the possible wartime reference occured to me. Adam is not a
name that crops up a great deal in Hindu tales :-) and the thought
crossed my mind of something done by British Forces....but I have no
basis for this, just speculation.

I doubt if foreigners would be allowed in the area in any case due to
the Tamil Tigers activities...I understand Sri Lanka is very cautious
about where it allows "tourists" to travel and may not accept
"looking for railway activity" as a reasonable excuse ;-)

Cheers

Iain
Aerolite Booktraders(UK)
Railway Book Specialists
<A HREF="http://www.aerolite.u-net.com">http://www.aerolite.u-net.com</A>

From: S.Shankar <>

Subject: Re: Cattle guard.

Date: 11 Oct 1999 20:51:03 -0500


Hello,
As a matter of fact, the term 'cattle guard' is used only on the IR. I
do not think any other railway system in the world has such a term.

The device has the sole purpose of removing obstructions from the track.
It has nothing to do with cows or cattle whatsoever. A further addition
to the device is two 'L' shaped fittings on each side, just above the
rail. This pushes small stones off the track.

I once witnessed a bizzare scene at Poona station, where a military
chap, apparently on transfer, had packed all his stuff into two massive
black wooden chests. The porters were crossing the tracks at the station
on the face of a train entering the station. The train was quite fast
and was heavily bearing down on them, when one of the wheels of the
trolley got stuck on the track. With the driver desperately blowing the
horn and the two porters trying the release the trolley (there would
have been a major disaster otherwise), they managed to free it just as
the train was within inches of them. In the deal, one of the chests fell
plop onto the path of the oncoming train, and there was no time to
retreive it.

The cowcatcher of the WCM/2 pushed the chest a good 50 yards till the
platform started. The chest was crushed between the platform and the
engine's cowcatcher, and was smashed to smithereens. All the contents of
the chest (mostly clothes + one table fan) were scattered all over.

Such is the power of this device. Imagine what would have happened if
there was no cowactcher, and the chest had got under the locomotive.

I guess the term cattle guard is the innovation of some lower level
Indian staff member with his broken English, who literally translated
the term as cow=cattle, catcher=guard. Actually, its one word,
cowcatcher, and not cow catcher!!

Cheers.

Shankar


Vijay Balasubramanian wrote:
>
> Isn't cow-catcher the same as cattle guard? Is this term used
exclusively
> on IR or
> on other railways as well?
>
> Vijay
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Apurva Bahadur [SMTP:iti@vsnl.email
> > Sent: Monday, October 11, 1999 2:47 AM
> > To: clzeni@mindspring.email
> > Cc: irfca@cs.email
> > Subject: Cattle guard.
> >
> > > Snowplows are ordered on all new US power, regardless of where it
will
> > > be operating. Primary reason is that the plow helps shunt the
vehicles
> > > of idiot motorists out of the way, helping keep the vehicle from
getting
> > > under the loco and derailing the train. Keeps the train crew from
being
> > > injured due to the actions of fools who try to beat the train to a
level
> > > crossing.
> >
> > In India the danger is really the cattle that can jam under the
locomotive
> > severely damaging
> > the underframe. Actually the solid cattle guard / snow plow (in the
> > tropical heat !) must be
> > an afterthought. The strip type item invariably gets damaged when
> > confronted with cattle. So
> > a solid item stands greater chance of remaining intact.
> > Please note the presence of a 'stone guard' which hangs below the
cattle
> > guard, hopefully
> > clearing the rail of smaller obstacles before they come under the
wheels.
> > The drivers
> > religiously check the clearance of this stone guard and the rail
before
> > accepting the loco
> > at the shed.
> > The loco often becomes immobilized as the brake pipes also get
damaged.
> > However I saw a picture of a 'new' WCM 5 (picture dated 1963) and
that had
> > a solid cattle
> > guard.
> >
> > Apurva
> >
> >

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