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From: prakash <>

Subject: Straps bridging fishplates

Date: 06 Jan 1999 18:23:10 -0500




Anand,

These straps which bridge each fishplate are used for signalling
circuits. They are formed a wire welded to rail and is much
thinner than cable.

Prakash



ranand@us.email on 01/06/99 06:47:25 AM

To: irfca@cs.email
cc: (bcc: Prakash Tendulkar/Santa Teresa/IBM)
Subject: Re: Voltage distribution in OHT





I recall from many years ago that in the Mumbai area DC electric system,
there are conducting straps which bridge each fishplate (for electrical
continuity I suppose). Are these still there?

Anand

Internet: anand@watson.email
External tel: (914) 784 7054
Notes: Rangachari Anand/Watson/IBM@IBMUS
Tie-line: 863 7054

From: Neki Impex S.A. <>

Subject: Re: Straps bridging fishplates

Date: 06 Jan 1999 19:19:21 -0500


Prakash,

I think what Anand is refering to is flat-straps of steel
across the fish plate (I think they are riveted to the rails)

Question: Are the rails grounded electrically? Something similar to the
household electricity, we are supplied both the live and neutral wires,
but
the neutral is grounded at source.

Suresh
<A HREF="http://www.trainweb.org/panama">http://www.trainweb.org/panama</A>



At 07:23 PM 1/6/99 -0700, you wrote:
>
>
>Anand,
>
>These straps which bridge each fishplate are used for signalling
>circuits. They are formed a wire welded to rail and is much
>thinner than cable.
>
>Prakash
>
>
>
>ranand@us.email on 01/06/99 06:47:25 AM
>
>To: irfca@cs.email
>cc: (bcc: Prakash Tendulkar/Santa Teresa/IBM)
>Subject: Re: Voltage distribution in OHT
>
>
>
>
>
>I recall from many years ago that in the Mumbai area DC electric
system,
>there are conducting straps which bridge each fishplate (for electrical
>continuity I suppose). Are these still there?
>
>Anand
>
>Internet: anand@watson.email
>External tel: (914) 784 7054
>Notes: Rangachari Anand/Watson/IBM@IBMUS
>Tie-line: 863 7054
>
>
>
>
>
>

From: prakash <>

Subject: Re: Straps bridging fishplates

Date: 06 Jan 1999 20:48:28 -0500




Folks,

Muhammed is also correct. Thick metalic straps are used
for grounding rails, especially near substations.

However, the connectors Anand was referring to, apply to
signal circuits.

Prakash
---------------------- Forwarded by Prakash Tendulkar/Santa Teresa/IBM
on
01/06/99 08:43 PM ---------------------------


"Muhammed A. Khan" <ashiane@erols.email on 01/06/99 07:12:04 PM

To: Prakash Tendulkar/Santa Teresa/IBM
cc:
Subject: Re: Straps bridging fishplates





There are usually two types of bond (strap) across the fishplate
depending
on its use. One is thicker and is for traction return and the other type
is
thinner and is for signaling purpose. There are also cross bonds for
ensuring proper functioning of signal and traction return.
Muhammed

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Re: Straps bridging fishplates

Date: 07 Jan 1999 01:53:45 -0500




Neki Impex S.A. wrote:

> Prakash,
>
> I think what Anand is refering to is flat-straps of steel
> across the fish plate (I think they are riveted to the rails)
>
> Question: Are the rails grounded electrically? Something similar to
the
> household electricity, we are supplied both the live and neutral
wires, but
> the neutral is grounded at source.

This is what I have heard - The 'neutral' is indeed connected to ground
at the
substation end, however the rails returning to the substation form the
bulk of
the return path. The connectivity of the earth (the mud, stones and
dust) is
not enough to carry back the thousands of amperes efficiently. Due to
the
large distance between the substation and the rail ends, the rails tend
to be
slightly above the earth potential, hence although you do not feel any
sensation of electrical shock when you touch the rails, the cattle feel
a
tingle when they touch the rails with their wet mouths. Thus the cattle
are
discouraged from feeding on the tracks. I know that this story is full
of
holes, but it has been told to me by someone who know a lot of the
practical
side of running trains.
While going from Pune to Mumbai have you guys noticed a long length of
rails
welded together what must be the return current link in a critical land
(on top
of a stone viaduct). The location is somewhere after Thakurwadi and
before
Palasdhari. This is the location where the Down track runs on a arch
type
bridge whose arches have been filled with stones. This can be seen some
distance from the Up track on the opposite hill, some 100 meters away.
The
heavy rails are welded together and run next to the tracks.

From: Neki Impex S.A. <>

Subject: Re: Straps bridging fishplates

Date: 07 Jan 1999 04:31:06 -0500


I remember having seen in some places Plastic Insulation sheets etc at
the
fishplate joints to insulate adjoining rails from each other. I suppose
that would be to seperate signalling circuits, since the sheets are not
thick enough to seperate high voltages, what with being exposed to dust
and
rain etc.

In these cases how is the electrical circuit completed for the "return"
path of the locomotive's current?

Suresh
<A HREF="http://www.trainweb.org/panama">http://www.trainweb.org/panama</A>


At 09:42 PM 06-01-99 -0700, you wrote:
>
>
>Hi Suresh,
>
>The rails are grounded electrically by thick metalic plates,
>near the substation. In addition, metallic strips are used to
>cross connect two rails of the same track. However, this is
>done at certain intervals and not at every fishplate.
>
>Prakash
>
>
>
>
>"Neki Impex S.A." <neki@sinfo.email on 01/06/99 07:19:21 PM
>
>To: irfca@cs.email
>cc: (bcc: Prakash Tendulkar/Santa Teresa/IBM)
>Subject: Re: Straps bridging fishplates
>
>
>
>
>
>Prakash,
>
>I think what Anand is refering to is flat-straps of steel
>across the fish plate (I think they are riveted to the rails)
>
>Question: Are the rails grounded electrically? Something similar to the
>household electricity, we are supplied both the live and neutral wires,
but
>the neutral is grounded at source.
>
>Suresh
><A HREF="http://www.trainweb.org/panama">http://www.trainweb.org/panama</A>
>
>
>
>At 07:23 PM 1/6/99 -0700, you wrote:
>>
>>
>>Anand,
>>
>>These straps which bridge each fishplate are used for signalling
>>circuits. They are formed a wire welded to rail and is much
>>thinner than cable.
>>
>>Prakash
>>
>>
>>
>>ranand@us.email on 01/06/99 06:47:25 AM
>>
>>To: irfca@cs.email
>>cc: (bcc: Prakash Tendulkar/Santa Teresa/IBM)
>>Subject: Re: Voltage distribution in OHT
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>I recall from many years ago that in the Mumbai area DC electric
system,
>>there are conducting straps which bridge each fishplate (for
electrical
>>continuity I suppose). Are these still there?
>>
>>Anand
>>
>>Internet: anand@watson.email
>>External tel: (914) 784 7054
>>Notes: Rangachari Anand/Watson/IBM@IBMUS
>>Tie-line: 863 7054
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>

From: Dheeraj Sanghi <>

Subject: Re: Happy New Year

Date: 07 Jan 1999 04:54:00 -0500



> As far as the introduction is concerned, Dheeraj had created
> one for an unfinished article a while back. It's somewhere
> in the archives. Dheeraj, do you have a personal copy of it?

Something is wrong with my email. I am being dumped with tonnes
of mail, but my own mails are not making it back to me. Let me
try again. If it is a duplicate email, please let me know.

I do remember creating an introduction, but that was years ago
in 1992-93 when I was managing the list, and I had written a
small note that I would send to new members. I am sorry I don't
have a copy of that now.

Wishing everyone a very happy new year.

-dheeraj

Apurva, did you get two mails from me around 30th Dec.

--------------
Dr. Dheeraj Sanghi (0512) 59-7077/7638
(Off)
Dept. of Computer Science & Engineering (0512) 59-8627 (Res)
Indian Institute of Technology (0512) 59-0725/0413
(Fax)
Kanpur - 208 016 (UP), INDIA. dheeraj@iitk.email
Home Page: <A HREF="http://www.cse.iitk.ac.in/users/dheeraj">http://www.cse.iitk.ac.in/users/dheeraj</A>

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: The YDM 3 loco

Date: 07 Jan 1999 08:32:55 -0500


Gang !

With reference to Viraf and Sarosh's latest pics uploaded by Prakash.
<A HREF="http://members.tripod.com/irfca/thats.htm">http://members.tripod.com/irfca/thats.htm</A>

I have come to like the YDM 3 loco very much. Not only is the short hood
pretty, the
long hood has lots of personality too. I just love the rakish horn
trumpet and the
dinky marker lamps. The roof line profile is just right and I wonder if
the height is
critical which is why the horn is desperately placed just below the roof
level. I also
liked the crazy yellow stripe on the two hoods. There seems to be a real
heavy duty
cattle guard on this loco, more like a snow plough.
With a two stroke (which has a gear driven 'Roots' blower rather than a
turbo
charger?) prime mover must also sound great.

I could also write a small note on what I like about the YDM 4, which
must be THE
prettiest diesel loco in India, but I shouldn't mix up issues.
If you have seen this site yesterday, please go there again today, there
are a few
more YDMx pictures.


Apurva

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Axle brushes

Date: 07 Jan 1999 08:33:21 -0500


Gang !

The mystery of the heavy current returning from the body of the loco to
the rails is
solved. There is a brushing contact known as an 'axle brush' in the
'axle box' which
is used to tranfer heavy traction currents to the wheels and ultimately
to the rails.
Hence the bearings would not be used as a electrical conductors, however
if the 'axle
brush' fails, the bearings would conduct the return current. This info
was found in
the glossary section of the railway technical resource page.
<A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Hangar/8788/index.html">http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Hangar/8788/index.html</A>
I'll check this up on my next visit to the electric loco shed at Pune.

Apurva

From: Dr. K.J. Walker & Mrs. M.E, Heath <>

Subject: Re: Voltage drop -- AC and DC

Date: 07 Jan 1999 15:17:02 -0500


Dear Apurva and all,
I noticed the query the other day about voltage drop on overhead
catenary, and have been rather surprised to notice that, although
several
people have commented on voltage variation, and recently on earthing,
there
has been nothing on drop.
So, just quickly, the basic difference between AC and DC
transmission
is that AC does not display voltage drop but DC does. This is why AC is
universally used for power distribution; coupled with the ability to
transform voltage levels, it minimises losses. Industrial-frequency AC
was
adopted by the French in th 1950s (and since then by everyone else)
precisely because of these advantages. Fewer costly substations are
needed,
reducing capital costs; AC overhead is lighter, because amperages
(currents)
are lower, and voltage drop is minimal, even in long sections. So for
AC,
voltage drop due to distance from substation or heavy traction current
demand is negligible. But DC, and particularly the "older" voltages such
as
600V (tramways) and 1500V (many suburban railways) is quite prone to
voltage
drop, and substations have to be closely spaced, catenary wires made of
adequate section, and so on. If the lights "brown out" when the train is
accelerating and drawing current, this will be due to voltage drop,
though
this is becoming rarer as lights are supplied from m-g sets rather than
connected in series across the line.
Hope that ain't too technical, or alternatively I haven't spooked
any
electrical experts.
Ken Walker
-----Original Message-----
From: Apurva Bahadur <iti@vsnl.email
To: Krishnan Anand <krish_nand@hotmail.email
Cc: irfca@cs.email <irfca@cs.email
Date: Wednesday, 6 January 1999 6:59
Subject: Re: Voltage distribution in OHT


>Krishnan Anand wrote:
>
>> Hi all,
>> I have heard people say that the voltage is not even in the
>> overhead traction throughout and there are certain zones where there
is
>> a drop and usually the panto is momentarily brought down. Is this
true ?
>> If yes why does this happen? Anyone to answer this ?
>>
>
>The substation connects to the OHE on end and the rails on the other.
>The
>loco picks up the current from the OHE and returns it to the substation
>via
>the rails. The voltage will be highest near the substation and lowest
at
>the
>point furthest away from the substation. The panto is held against the
>wires
>by compressed air and will remain in position even if the voltage drops
>to
>zero, as long as the air pressure is present in the reservoir. I have
>seen a
>WCM 4 waiting at Pune Jn with zero volts on the line voltmeter. The
>fault
>was rectified after about 15 minutes and I have witnessed the meter
jump
>from 0 to 1500 V. During all this period, the panto was continuously
up.
>There is a battery driven 'baby compressor' which allows the air
>pressure to
>be built up initially so that the panto can be raised. After the panto
>is
>raised, the main air compressor is started and the 'baby' can be shut
>down.
>I remember someone in the Pune shed telling me (but cannot confirm)
that
>the
>WCG 1 (EF/1) locos had a manually operated air pump (like a cycle tyre
>pump), although the 'No Problem Saheb' book show a pole being used to
>push
>the panto and start the WCG1.The voltage limits defined by the RDSO
for
>the
>new MEMU (main line EMU ) is that it should work satisfactorily between
>18.5
>KV - 30 KV. I suppose a mainline loco will also have similar specs.
>
>Apurva
>
>

From: Anne Ogborn <>

Subject: Re: One eyed WDM 2

Date: 07 Jan 1999 20:28:36 -0500


Apurva Bahadur wrote:
>
> Gang !
>
> Just to report a sighting of a low nose 'Jumbo' WDM 2 ...

ooh... is there more than one nose type for WDMs's???
I've never seen a low nose WDM2, but of course my experience is
limited by my location!

Somebody please enlighten me on this before I commit Apurva's pictures
to styrene.

Annie

From: Anne Ogborn <>

Subject: electrical safety and overhead wires

Date: 07 Jan 1999 20:48:29 -0500


On another list (US railfans) I mentioned that India had a lot of OH
wire.
Somebody asked if, given the stereotype of Indians traveling on the
roofs,
that led to a lot of electrocutions.

Has anybody seen anyone crazy enough to ride on a roof in electrified
territory?

Annie

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Re: electrical safety and overhead wires

Date: 07 Jan 1999 22:35:36 -0500




Anne Ogborn wrote:

> On another list (US railfans) I mentioned that India had a lot of OH
wire.
> Somebody asked if, given the stereotype of Indians traveling on the
roofs,
> that led to a lot of electrocutions.
>
> Has anybody seen anyone crazy enough to ride on a roof in electrified
territory?

Yes ! I have seen lots of daredevils travelling on the roof of the
1.5KVDC Mumbai
lines. There is also a 'public awareness' type ads on the Bengali
channel of
Doordarshan which showns people travelling on the roof of a Calcutta EMU
(which is
25,000 VAC !!!!) - now that required real guts or a total lack of any
concern for
personal safety. But then the prople who travel on the roof are
desperate and will
die sooner or later possibly from a railway accident. I remember a
picture that had
appeared in the Times of India where a man had been electrocuted and was
lying on
the pantograph frame as the train travelled on its route. Nothing much
can be done
for this poor soul till the end of the journey. where the OHE would have
to be shut
off and the body removed. I doubt if anyone travels on the roof of a
mainline AC
hauled train. Other dangers that face rooftop travellers is the bridge
girders.

Apurva

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Re: One eyed WDM 2

Date: 07 Jan 1999 22:50:12 -0500




Anne Ogborn wrote:

> Apurva Bahadur wrote:
> >
> > Gang !
> >
> > Just to report a sighting of a low nose 'Jumbo' WDM 2 ...
>
> ooh... is there more than one nose type for WDMs's???
> I've never seen a low nose WDM2, but of course my experience is
> limited by my location!

Go to Bharat and Siddharth's site for a picture of a Jumbo, if you have
Jal Daboo's book he too has a drawing and a photo of a Jumbo.Go to:
<A HREF="http://members.tripod.com/~railinindia/rail2.html">http://members.tripod.com/~railinindia/rail2.html</A>

Larry has reported a WDM 2 with a nose in the door type American styled
cab as well.

Apurva



>
>
> Somebody please enlighten me on this before I commit Apurva's pictures
> to styrene.
>
> Annie

From: Anurag Acharya <>

Subject: Re: electrical safety and overhead wires

Date: 07 Jan 1999 23:54:38 -0500



>Yes ! I have seen lots of daredevils travelling on the roof of the
1.5KVDC Mumbai
>lines. There is also a 'public awareness' type ads on the Bengali
channel of
>Doordarshan which showns people travelling on the roof of a Calcutta
EMU (which is
>25,000 VAC !!!!) - now that required real guts or a total lack of any
concern for
>personal safety. But then the prople who travel on the roof are
desperate and will
>die sooner or later possibly from a railway accident.


Apurva, apurva! Them's harsh words :) Have you sampled the joys of the
roof? It can be heavenly. I remember a wonderful evening on the roof
of Bikaner Mail from Sursar to Ratangarh. It was a moonlit night and
the desert had cooled off by then. There were many of us on the
roof. The train runs at a decent clip but isn't really fast. The sand
doesn't fly much at that hour and the wind feels nice on the skin. And
you can see for miles.

Of course, the Bikaner-Rewari line is not electrified. And yes, I had
no reservation...

anurag

From: Dr. K.J. Walker & Mrs. M.E, Heath <>

Subject: Re: One eyed WDM 2

Date: 07 Jan 1999 23:56:22 -0500


Hi Annie,
Yep, there were "chopped-nose" WDM2s. I don't think they built very
many;
there was some talkt that crews didn't like them. But I've certainly
seen
them. Your more typical engine is the standard version, though.
HNY
Ken Walker

-----Original Message-----
From: Anne Ogborn <anniepoo@netmagic.email
To: Apurva Bahadur <iti@vsnl.email
Cc: IRFCA <irfca@cs.email
Date: Friday, 8 January 1999 2:57
Subject: Re: One eyed WDM 2


>Apurva Bahadur wrote:
>>
>> Gang !
>>
>> Just to report a sighting of a low nose 'Jumbo' WDM 2 ...
>
>ooh... is there more than one nose type for WDMs's???
>I've never seen a low nose WDM2, but of course my experience is
>limited by my location!
>
>Somebody please enlighten me on this before I commit Apurva's pictures
>to styrene.
>
>Annie
>

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Re: electrical safety and overhead wires

Date: 08 Jan 1999 00:16:19 -0500


Anurag really does read all the mails! Rooftop travel on MG trains
working slowly is OK
- the issue is about electric locos traveling at high speeds. Thanks for
maintaining the
IRFCA mailing list - here is a massive cheer to our 'sysop'

Apurva

Anurag Acharya wrote:

> >Yes ! I have seen lots of daredevils travelling on the roof of the
1.5KVDC Mumbai
> >lines. There is also a 'public awareness' type ads on the Bengali
channel of
> >Doordarshan which showns people travelling on the roof of a Calcutta
EMU (which is
> >25,000 VAC !!!!) - now that required real guts or a total lack of any
concern for
> >personal safety. But then the prople who travel on the roof are
desperate and will
> >die sooner or later possibly from a railway accident.
>
> Apurva, apurva! Them's harsh words :) Have you sampled the joys of the
> roof? It can be heavenly. I remember a wonderful evening on the roof
> of Bikaner Mail from Sursar to Ratangarh. It was a moonlit night and
> the desert had cooled off by then. There were many of us on the
> roof. The train runs at a decent clip but isn't really fast. The sand
> doesn't fly much at that hour and the wind feels nice on the skin. And
> you can see for miles.
>
> Of course, the Bikaner-Rewari line is not electrified. And yes, I had
> no reservation...
>
> anurag

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Calling on signals

Date: 08 Jan 1999 02:06:47 -0500


Gang!

What is the exact purpose of the 'calling on' signal ? Many trains
approaching Mumbai CSTM are stopped at the home signal. After a few
minutes wait, a lighted 'C' appears on smaller lamp near the home
signals and the train slowly moves onto the platform. I know the
official explanation that the calling on signal is used to permit a
rake to move to the platform line in event of the signal malfunction
or obstruction on the tracks. But then the track at CSTM is clear
with nothing standing on them. So why is the 'calling on' signal
used ?

Apurva

From: prakash <>

Subject: Re: electrical safety and overhead wires

Date: 08 Jan 1999 04:35:57 -0500




Annie,

I have seen several such dare devils in Mumbai. They can be
spotted often between Andheri and Bombay Central section of
Western Railway during morning peak hours. The ideal spot for
viewing them is the overhead bridge connecting Matunga
Railway quarters and Tulsi Pipe Road.

There are several hazards to be dodged. The overhead wire is
laid in zig-zag pattern so the guy has to gyrate constantly.
He also has to balance himself when rake negotiates a curve.
The most dangerous one is at Mahalaxmi station on UP through
line.

One mistake and .... this guy becomes a history. Overhead
power rarely trips off during electrocution so motorman will
never know of it. The body is spotted by another motorman who
will not bother stop his train for this soul, instead
reporting about it to Station Master at the next scheduled
stop.

In a rare incident, while I was in driving cab, one such dare
devil came over the driving cab and started dancing there. The
spot was Bassein bridge, a straight track of 1 kilometer.
Annoyed by the banging on roof top, motorman applied brakes
heavily. In a split second, this guy was off the roof (into
the waters). Motorman commented calmly, "Chalo, ek lukhkha
aadmi mar gaya".

Prakash



Anne Ogborn <anniepoo@netmagic.email on 01/07/99 08:48:29 PM

To: Harsh Vardhan <hvc@vsnl.email
cc: "S. Shankar" <shankie@emirates.email Indian Railway Fan Club
Association <irfca@cs.email (bcc: Prakash Tendulkar/Santa
Teresa/IBM)
Subject: electrical safety and overhead wires





On another list (US railfans) I mentioned that India had a lot of OH
wire.
Somebody asked if, given the stereotype of Indians traveling on the
roofs,
that led to a lot of electrocutions.

Has anybody seen anyone crazy enough to ride on a roof in electrified
territory?

Annie

From: prakash <>

Subject: Re: Calling on signals

Date: 08 Jan 1999 05:03:49 -0500




Apurva,

The purpose of Calling On signal is exactly as you have mentioned,
i.e. in case of malfunction of signalling system, it is used to
move the rakes.

Churchgate and CST cabins are automated. The cabinman normally
presses two buttons, one for the platform on which the rake is at
Masjid (or Marine Lines in WR) and the platform # at CST (or
Churchgate in WR) where it is supposed to land. Interlocking Route
Relay system handles the rest.

The signals are classified as Auto (with painted A sign), semi-auto
(with lamp glowing behind A sign, to indicate either auto mode or
with lamp off to indicate manual mode) and manual (no sign). If
signal is auto or in auto mode, motorman will stop and then start
cautiously a minute later towards the next signal.

For any reason, if this does not happen, and the cabin shows that
the track has been allocated successfully for this rake, cabinman
will press button for "C" for that signal. The assumption is I
have cleared the track for you but you are not moving, so I believe
that signal is not showing the right aspect to you.

Prakash



Apurva Bahadur <iti@vsnl.email on 01/08/99 02:06:47 AM

To: IRFCA <irfca@cs.email "Muhammed A. Khan" <ashiane@erols.email
cc: (bcc: Prakash Tendulkar/Santa Teresa/IBM)
Subject: Calling on signals





Gang!

What is the exact purpose of the 'calling on' signal ? Many trains
approaching Mumbai CSTM are stopped at the home signal. After a few
minutes wait, a lighted 'C' appears on smaller lamp near the home
signals and the train slowly moves onto the platform. I know the
official explanation that the calling on signal is used to permit a
rake to move to the platform line in event of the signal malfunction
or obstruction on the tracks. But then the track at CSTM is clear
with nothing standing on them. So why is the 'calling on' signal
used ?

Apurva

From: Madhav Acharya <>

Subject: Re: electrical safety and overhead wires

Date: 08 Jan 1999 05:38:54 -0500


The one time I've seen someone in a dangerous position
on a train roof in an electrified section was while waiting at Kanjur
Marg (CR) on the way to Dadar. An express EMU travelling North (towards
Kalyan I guess) zipped by and there was this chap standing on the
roof with his arms stretched out sideways and legs bent slightly (to
maintain
balance presumably). The train must have been doing at least 60 mph, if
not
more. I mentioned this to my Dad, who had been on CR for a long time,
and
he told me
that there were a lot of these "heroes" who went on rooftops like this
in
order
to impress a woman. Of course, quite a few of them ended up getting
fried
as well !
Another danger of rooftop travel that is more frequent than
electrocution
is being
hit by the roof of a tunnel or bridge. I remember an accident a long
time
ago when
about 50 people on the roof of a train got knocked off by a bridge.

Speaking of bridges - for a long time, I had this misconception that
people caught
for ticketless travel were thrown off the train while it was over a
bridge. When I was
very young, I remember travelling in ordinary 1st class and I was
wandering in the
corridor when I saw an RPF person with someone he had caught without
a ticket. The train happened to be going over a bridge at that time,
and
the door
of the coach was open. I, therefore, assumed that the offender was
going
to be booted
out !

Madhav

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