IRFCA Mailing List Archive

Messages 3981 - 4000

Previous 20 Messages          Archive Index          Next 20 Messages

From: Balasubramanian, Vijay <>

Subject: Re: Through trains in Termini

Date: 02 Nov 1998 07:29:15 -0500


>
> I was thinking about how many through trains use termini like Chennai
> Central or Howrah. Let me simplify. There are many trains
> which come to
> Chennai central on their dead end platform, then a loco is attached on
> the other end and then the trains goes elsewhere. I have seen
> a Rajdhani
> (Trivandrum - NDLS I think) do this at Chennai before the advent of
> Konkan rail. This sort of trains never have used the Mumbai CSTM. Can
> the gang list any other trains and termini which fit this
> description ?

A similar situation exists at Visakhapatnam which is a terminus. All
through trains
such as the Coromandel Exp. and the Howrah-Chennai Mail arrive at a
dead-end
plaform,
then the loco. changes ends and the train continues towards its
destination.
To elaborate,
a north-east bound train running parallel to the coast negogiates a
steep
curve as it
approaches the station, and then heads towards the coast. A few
kilometers
before the
station it meets the other set of tracks, they merge into one pair and
lead
the train to
the terminus. After reversal, the train employs this 'common' stretch
and
then branches off
towards Vizianagaram/Howrah. The following is a crude layout:

------- ------
from Chennai/ ------ \/ ----- to Vizinagaram/Howrah
Annakapalle \/\/
| |
| |
-----
Visakhapatnam

In fact, there is an additional electrified track that accompanies the
pair from V'patnam
till Kottavalasa from where it branches off towards Kirandul. This is
used
to transport
Manganese ore (anything else?) to the Vizag port. During my trip on the
Chennai-Howrah Mail
we overtook one of these BOX freight trains hauled by three WAM4s - what
a
memorable sight!!!

I don't seem to recall a bypass line which would obviate the need to
reverse directions.
Is there one?


Another example would be the Tata/Hatia - Pathankot Exp. which
reverses at
Amritsar.


Regards,
Vijay

From: Madhav Acharya <>

Subject: Re: Through trains in Termini

Date: 02 Nov 1998 07:59:58 -0500


Hi

I remember travelling from Calcutta to Puri on SER many years ago and
the
train
dead-ended at Puri - I think it had to reverse out and go further south
but
I'm not sure of
that.

Madhav





"Balasubramanian, Vijay" <vbalasubramanian@noblestar.email on 11/02/98
10:29:15 AM

To: Apurva Bahadur <iti@giaspn01.email IRFCA
<irfca@cs.email
cc: (bcc: Madhav Acharya/EastCoast/Mobil-Notes)
Subject: RE: Through trains in Termini





>
> I was thinking about how many through trains use termini like Chennai
> Central or Howrah. Let me simplify. There are many trains
> which come to
> Chennai central on their dead end platform, then a loco is attached on
> the other end and then the trains goes elsewhere. I have seen
> a Rajdhani
> (Trivandrum - NDLS I think) do this at Chennai before the advent of
> Konkan rail. This sort of trains never have used the Mumbai CSTM. Can
> the gang list any other trains and termini which fit this
> description ?

A similar situation exists at Visakhapatnam which is a terminus. All
through trains
such as the Coromandel Exp. and the Howrah-Chennai Mail arrive at a
dead-end
plaform,
then the loco. changes ends and the train continues towards its
destination.
To elaborate,
a north-east bound train running parallel to the coast negogiates a
steep
curve as it
approaches the station, and then heads towards the coast. A few
kilometers
before the
station it meets the other set of tracks, they merge into one pair and
lead
the train to
the terminus. After reversal, the train employs this 'common' stretch
and
then branches off
towards Vizianagaram/Howrah. The following is a crude layout:

------- ------
from Chennai/ ------ \/ ----- to Vizinagaram/Howrah
Annakapalle \/\/
| |
| |
-----
Visakhapatnam

In fact, there is an additional electrified track that accompanies the
pair from V'patnam
till Kottavalasa from where it branches off towards Kirandul. This is
used
to transport
Manganese ore (anything else?) to the Vizag port. During my trip on the
Chennai-Howrah Mail
we overtook one of these BOX freight trains hauled by three WAM4s - what
a
memorable sight!!!

I don't seem to recall a bypass line which would obviate the need to
reverse directions.
Is there one?


Another example would be the Tata/Hatia - Pathankot Exp. which
reverses
at
Amritsar.


Regards,
Vijay

From: Balasubramanian, Vijay <>

Subject: Re: Reply to Poras (+ request for favorite train journeys)

Date: 02 Nov 1998 08:34:41 -0500


> Dear Poras,
>
> Received your exciting report on the Geetanjali Express.
> Thanh you for calling
> it a Prestige train. My experience of the train up and down
> to Howrah some two
> years ageo was less exciting. Indeed the train reached in
> time almost at all
> stations but could have reached earlier at every station as
> you experienced.
>
> geetanjali is not considered as popular as the 8001/8002
> calcutta Mumbal mail.
> The AC 2 Tier was badly maintained. The train did not have a
> pantry car on
> both the journeys. We came across many rats in the AC
> compartment. I did
> extensive footplating on those journeys and met many
> interesting drivers. We
> and rann really well. True , this train

It saddens me, no end, to see the Gitanjali's demise. My experiences
with
this train have been far more pleasant. Of course, that was way back in
the
early 80s. I recall my journey from Mumbai CST (then Bombay V.T.) to
Tatanagar during
summer of 1980. I had the good fortune of traveling in the sleeper
3-tier
coach right next to
the loco. The rake had the elegant vermillion red-yellow livery. A
cream-blue WCAM1 (Bombay shed?) took charge till Igatpuri and then a
blue-with-yellow-stripe WAM4 (Igatpuri shed) took over. A WDM2 did the
honors between Bhusaval and Durg. A Tatanagar WAM4 (green with a grey
strip
in the middle bordered by two yellow stripes) took over at Durg. By
that
time,
Bilaspur and Dadar had been added to the halt list and Igatpuri had
become a
commercial
halt for the Dn. train. The train was on/before time at every station
even
with a
Bombay-Howrah runtime of ~29 hrs. Being the only superfast in the
Kalyan-Wardha and
Nagpur-Kharagpur sections at that time, it was a thrill to experience
the
train speeding through Nasik Rd. and ignoring Kalyan, Manmad and Gondia
among others. Catering service was excellent with cool drinks and
snacks
arriving every hour to take us through the summer heat. The coach was
well-maintained with no unauthorized passengers. At that time,
traveling in
non-AC 3-tier was a pleasant experience, atleast in such superfast
trains.
Alas, things have changed - this Composite First Class is our only hope.
BTW, how many IR trains have First Class service?


> can travel the distance in well under 30 hours but it is the
> strategy of the
> deprtment to make sure that trains should always be in a
> position to make up
> time if delayed. How else do you explain that the Ra Rajdhani
> covers the
> Mumbai Delhi haul in 17 hrs for which the Golden temple Mail takes 22?
>

A significant factor is the difference in booked speeds that govern the
run-times as per the timetable. The Raj. has a booked speed of 115
kmph.
between Virar and Godhra whereas the
GT Mail has 95/100. Similarly, the Raj's booked speed is 120 between
Raltam
and N.Delhi
whereas the GT Mail has 100. And then the GT Mail has all those
additional
halts.


Vijay

P.S. How about another round of mails where we describe our favorite
train
journeys. We did
have one a while back but then the net has acquired so many new members.
I
just described one
of mine :-)

From: Shankar <>

Subject: Re: Through trains in Termini

Date: 02 Nov 1998 09:37:52 -0500


Hello,
Three examples spring to my mind at the first instance:

Cochin-Gauhati Raptisagar Express: reverses at Madras Central (Chennai)
Cochin-Patna Express: --"-- --"--
--"--
Bhubaneshwar-N.Delhi Rajdhani Express: reverses at Howrah

So much for meeting dead ends and reversing out.

If you consider mere reversing, at stations without a dead end, several
trains reverse at Poona: come in from one side, and go out the same way
onto
another track: these are the Maharashtra Express, Suwarnajayanti Express
and
Nizamuddin-Goa Express.
Did you know that the Poona-Jammu Jhelum Express reverses (changes
direction) THRICE during its journey: first at Daund, then at Ambala,and
finally at Pathankot.

Best regards.

Shankar




At 10:34 PM 11/1/98 +0530, you wrote:
>Gang !
>
>I was thinking about how many through trains use termini like Chennai
>Central or Howrah. Let me simplify. There are many trains which come to
>Chennai central on their dead end platform, then a loco is attached on
>the other end and then the trains goes elsewhere. I have seen a
Rajdhani
>(Trivandrum - NDLS I think) do this at Chennai before the advent of
>Konkan rail. This sort of trains never have used the Mumbai CSTM. Can
>the gang list any other trains and termini which fit this description ?
>
>Apurva
>
>

From: Shankar <>

Subject: Re: Fairy Queen v/s Sindh

Date: 02 Nov 1998 09:37:54 -0500


Hello,
Ah yes, there are several contradictions and discrepancies with regards
to
the first train.
The classic b/w pic of the FIRST TRAIN IN INDIA (over the Thana bridge)
shows the train being hauled by only ONE engine.
I read somewhere that that was the pic of the first train undergoing a
trial
run, the first COMMERCIAL run was hauled by the three engines: Sultan,
Sahib
and Sindh a few days later (16 Apr 1853).
I have also read vague reports that the first railway in India was in
teh
Punjab on some dam construction site. This engine ran as early as 1839
or
something.(I'm not too sure of the year).
Yet again, I have seen reports contradicting the very fact that the
first
trainran on 16 Apr.1853. These purists hold that the first trains to run
in
India were those that ran during the construction of the first
railwayi.e.
1849 or something.
Perhaps we should refine the statement to say that 16 Apr 1853 saw the
first
COMMERCIAL train run in India.
Best regards.
Shankar



At 07:50 PM 11/1/98 -0500, you wrote:
>Looking at Hugh Hughes' book, Indian Locomotives Part 1 under
>section for GIP Railways, SINDH, GIPR #44 was acquired during 1856-7.
>The inaugural train rolled on VT-Thane route on April 16, 1853 so
>it certainly could not be hauled by SINDH or her sister engines
>made by Kitson. (The railway was opened to public two days on
>April 18, 1853, Ref: History of Bombay Suburban Railways by
>Dr. A.K.Arora))
>
>The first 8 engines were made by Vulcan Foundry in 1851-2 for
>Sterling Pounds 1675 each. The first one was named FALKLAND and
>became operational on February 23, 1852. They had 2-4-0 layout like
>Kitsons. Of these, 1,2 and 8 went to BBCIR in 1862-3.
>
>The book shows a picture of SINDH which resembles close to similar
>loco made by Sharp, Stewart & Co. in 1865.
>
>Reading this book, I found a minor error. During introduction,
>author writes that maker of first loco is unknown. He contradicts this
>statement under GIPR section, quoting the name and price quoted by
>each bidder.
>
>Prakash
>

From: Shankar <>

Subject: Re: Homing at Chennai

Date: 02 Nov 1998 09:37:55 -0500


Hello,
Talking of typical American terms, somemore spring to mind:

Indian: dining car: U.S.: Diner
shunting engine: (road) switcher
sleeper (car) sleeping car
sleeper: tie
coupling: coupler
CBC coupling: buck eye coupler
engine: locomotive
loco shed: roundhouse
loco foreman: roundhouse foreman
bogie (wheel set): truck
level crossing railroad crossing
bogie (compartment) car
wagon freight car
engine driver engineer to state a
few.

Actually, the Brits played a major role in determining the nomenclature.
However, even they might not have bargained for certain Indianizations:

like the British engines are manned by a driver and a stoker
US engines have an engineer and a fireman.
The IR has adapted this, and Indian trains have a driver and a fireman.

One major erro in IR parlance is the cattle guard. (cowcatcher in US
lingo).
This device is for removing large obstructions from the track, i.e.
pushing them
clear of the engine's path. It has nothing to do with cows or cattle
whatsoever.

Best regards.
Shankar


At 09:25 PM 11/1/98 -0800, you wrote:
>
>
>Vdate@aol.email wrote:
>
>> rake is consist... a permanent set of coaches which forms a train
minus the
>> engine. Some other equivalent words are (American equivalent in
parenthesis)
>> : driver (engineer), platform (track), hamal(redcap), diner (dining
>> car),wc(restroom), restroom (waiting room),booking office (ticket
office),
>> ring (call on phone). Readers, please add.
>
>US Indian
>fireman asst. driver
>porter kuli
>car attendent guard
>ticket taker TTE
>based homed (sometimes "shopped", as in
"shopped
out of
>Bakersfield")
>east/west up/down
>car wagon/van
>truck bogie
>hired out inducted
>
>
>Question - in the US there's an engineer (usually a very junior
engineer) whose
>job
>is to move engines about the yard and roundhouse area. We call this
person a
>"hostler" - what's the equivilant Indian term?
>
>Also, what's the pointed iron grill on the lower front of a steam
engine we
call
>a "pilot" or "cowcatcher" called?
>My wallpaper's a WP4 that has one.
>
>
>
>

From: Shankar <>

Subject: Re: Homing at Chennai

Date: 02 Nov 1998 09:37:57 -0500


Hello,
The system was first introduced in 1988.
If I remember right, the 1st digit denotes the region/originating
railway,
the 2nd digit denotes the homing shed/yard, and the last two digits
stand
for the train number.
If you were following the transition, you would observe that the last
two
digits have basically remained unchanged: e.g.
177/188 Jhelum Express changed to 4677/4678 and was again changed to
1077/1078.
11/12 Dadar Express became 6511/6512
27/28 Varanasi Dadar Exp became 1027/1028
1/2 Bombay Howrah Mail changed to 8001/8002 etc.
The only radical change was with the superfasts: 2xxx.
One train which beat me hollow was the 9/10 Bombay-Madras Mail.
This train, one would expect would have either a CR no (1xxx) or a SR
no.
(6xxx). Horror upon horrors, the train was given an SC no. 7009/7010!
I believe this has been changed just recently, and the train is a 6
something.

This 4 digit system does not apply to stopping passenger trains, some of
which retained their 2 or 3 digit numbering (327/328 Poona-Hyderabad
Passenger),
but you do see some stopping passenger trains with the 4 digit number as
well, esp on the CR.

With all digits 1-9 being used up, Konkan Railway trains are KRxxx.

Best regards.

Shankar


At 08:44 PM 10/31/98 -0500, you wrote:
>Hi Gang
>
>I am trying (very hard) to track along with the explanations for the
>numbering of trains. While I have understood how superfast trains are
>numbered, I am not sure what happens to a non super fast train. For
>instance, Shankar pointed out in his message that 6511/6512 is the
Madras
>(Chennai)-Bombay, where the 6xxx stands for a SR train. In this case,
what
>does the 5 (second digit) stand for? It does not seem to represent the
>destination railway.
>
>
>>
>>Actually, its the 6 which has caused all the confusion. Actually, what
>>Apurva means that SR trains originating out of Madras will usually
have
>>their numbers commencing with 6, eg. 6511/6512 Madras (Chenai)-Bombay
>>(mumbai) Exp.
>>What Apurva meant was that Madras is Zone 6: SR.
>>
>
>Pushkala Raman (praman@garnet.email
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Florida State University, Marketing Department
>Room 525 Rovetta Business Building, Tallahassee FL 32306-1110
>Ph: 850-644-9283
>
><A HREF="http://garnet.acns.fsu.edu/~praman">http://garnet.acns.fsu.edu/~praman</A>
>
>
>

From: Madhav Acharya <>

Subject: Re: Reply to Poras (+ request for favorite train journeys)

Date: 02 Nov 1998 09:42:10 -0500


Hi

My most frequent journeys have been on the AC express (Deluxe) from
Delhi
to Howrah. It was
81 Up/82 Dn back then - the last time I went on it was in 1990. The
train
used to leave Delhi around 4 in the evening.
The highlight of the evening was "tundla ki tikki" - aloo (potato)
tikkis
(cutlets) freshly made on the
platform at Tundla. Kanpur, Allahabad, Varanasi used to come during the
night and I think we reached
Mughalsarai the next morning. Anyone who has been along this route (and
to
MAS as well) - will testify to
the greatest advertising campaign of the 20th century - one that urges
you
to see Prof. Arora of Karolbagh,
New Delhi for marriage-related counseling - he also has branches in USA
and Canada ! The landscape also
changed considerably during the trip - from being more green and open
in
UP to very rocky, hilly terrain in
Bihar. A major attraction was at Gaya where you could (supposedly) see
the
Bodhi tree from the platform.
Durgapur steel mill was quite impressive. Nearer to Calcutta, the local
trains from Bardhaman used to overtake
the train much to the irritation of all on board. Of course, Howrah
station was a sight in itself - I haven't been there
in years but I gather that it has changed quite a bit ? The one thing I
found unique about it was that the cars
used to drive through the center of the station and pick up passengers
-
of course adding to the mess !

I once footplated on the Rajdhani WAP loco from Howrah (4pm) to Dhanbad
(7
pm)- the first halt after 3 hrs. The drivers
were a bit agitated because the train got delayed by 3 minutes coming
into
Dhanbad due to overhead line
repairs on the way. Of course, that was just the start - due to a
massive
accident somewhere along the grand
chord, they had to switch to a double-headed diesel arrangment and go
via
Patna which got us around 6 hrs late
into Delhi. BTW why is it called "footplate" ? Does it come from the
days
of the steam loco ? I also noted that each
time we passed another train, it would turn off its headlight and put it
back on again - is that usually done ?

On my past two trips back home, I've travelled by the KK express from
Delhi
to Bangalore. Besides the time
it takes (~ 41 hrs), the train is pretty nice - and I find the farther
south you go, the nicer the attendants become.
There was a loco failure one trip and we only had one diesel pulling us
over the hills, with two people running
along side throwing sand on the tracks - that's the first time I've seen
such a thing outside of NG hill railways.

Madhav

From: Madhav Acharya <>

Subject: Re: Through trains in Termini

Date: 02 Nov 1998 10:09:49 -0500


Hi,

Regarding train numbering - is there any move to make adjustments
for the 6 new zonal railways ? We had the right number of zones as
digits from 1-9. By introducing six new zones, the railways has created
another "Y2K" problem !

Madhav

From: Balasubramanian, Vijay <>

Subject: Re: Through trains in Termini

Date: 02 Nov 1998 10:27:13 -0500


>
> If you consider mere reversing, at stations without a dead
> end, several
> trains reverse at Poona: come in from one side, and go out
> the same way onto
> another track: these are the Maharashtra Express,
> Suwarnajayanti Express and
> Nizamuddin-Goa Express.
> Did you know that the Poona-Jammu Jhelum Express reverses (changes
> direction) THRICE during its journey: first at Daund, then at
> Ambala,and
> finally at Pathankot.

There is no direction reversal at Ambala for the Jhelum Exp. The third
one
happens at
Jallandhar City. It would be interesting to find out how many more
trains
have three or more direction reversals during their entire run. One set
of
trains that comes to my mind is
the Guwahati/Patna-Trivandrum/Cochin/Bangalore Exps. with reversals at
Howrah, Visakhapatnam and
Chennai Central. Any others?


Vijay

From: Balasubramanian, Vijay <>

Subject: Re: Reply to Poras (+ request for favorite train journeys)

Date: 02 Nov 1998 10:33:06 -0500


> Durgapur steel mill was quite impressive. Nearer to
> Calcutta, the local
> trains from Bardhaman used to overtake
> the train much to the irritation of all on board. Of course, Howrah

That's interesting. Would this overtake happen in the quadruple track
section
between Asansol and Barddhaman (then your train would not have to stop
for
an overtake)
or in the double-line stretch after Barddhaman?


>
> I once footplated on the Rajdhani WAP loco from Howrah (4pm)
> to Dhanbad (7
> pm)- the first halt after 3 hrs. The drivers

That's neat!!! Did it require a formal written permission from the
authorities?

Vijay

From: Jishnu Mukerji <>

Subject: Re: Homing at Chennai

Date: 02 Nov 1998 10:37:36 -0500


Anne Ogborn wrote:
>

> US Indian
> fireman asst. driver
> porter kuli
> car attendent guard

Isn't a "conductor" in the US the equivalent of a "guard" in India? It
is the "conductor" who is overall operational in-charge of the train -
at least on Amtrak and NJTransit.

Then there are assistant conductors etc.

I think the equivalent of american "car attendant" is the "coach
attendant" in India - say in sleeper coaches for example.

BTW, in the US, Amtrak just entered into a new contract with the BLE
that allows Amtrak to allocate only a single engineer on trains that
have less than 6 hour runs, e.g. almost all the trains on the NorthEast
Corridor. So no more firemen on these trains. This was already the case
for quite sometime on the 125 mph Metroliners and otherNew York -
Washington trains.

--
Jishnu Mukerji

From: Madhav Acharya <>

Subject: Re: New Zones

Date: 02 Nov 1998 10:46:44 -0500


I thought they were already a reality ? Only the heads of each of these
zones
is not a GM but an Officer on Special Duty (OSD) (info courtesy IR
website). But
the trappings that are part and parcel of a new zone are evident in
Bangalore
(South Western Railway). I liked the 9 zones too - adding more is
equivalent
to each person having their own stretch of track !

Madhav





Vadi Elumalai <vadi@ins.email on 11/02/98 01:49:52 PM

To: Madhav Acharya/EastCoast/Mobil-Notes
cc: protip@giasbmc.email irfca@cs.email
Subject: New Zones







Will the 6 new zones ever become a reality? It was a political
move by Ram Vilas Paswan to appease regional interests. I for one would
be happy if IR stays with the current 9 zones.

-Vadi


> Hi,
>
> Regarding train numbering - is there any move to make adjustments
> for the 6 new zonal railways ? We had the right number of zones as
> digits from 1-9. By introducing six new zones, the railways has
created
> another "Y2K" problem !
>
> Madhav

From: Vadi Elumalai <>

Subject: New Zones

Date: 02 Nov 1998 10:49:52 -0500




Will the 6 new zones ever become a reality? It was a political
move by Ram Vilas Paswan to appease regional interests. I for one would
be happy if IR stays with the current 9 zones.

-Vadi


> Hi,
>
> Regarding train numbering - is there any move to make adjustments
> for the 6 new zonal railways ? We had the right number of zones as
> digits from 1-9. By introducing six new zones, the railways has
created
> another "Y2K" problem !
>
> Madhav

From: skb <>

Subject: Re: Reply to Poras (+ request for favorite train journeys)

Date: 02 Nov 1998 11:17:46 -0500


> The highlight of the evening was "tundla ki tikki" - aloo (potato)
tikkis
> (cutlets) freshly made on the
> platform at Tundla. Kanpur, Allahabad, Varanasi used to come during
the

I remember this. Also, I vaguely remember also at some other station
people
selling some sweets )laaddus? never sampled one) in earthen pots. The
interesting thing was that the pots were all wrapped in very colorful
papers..

Samir

From: Iain A Fraser <>

Subject: Re: Plinthed loco at SCR HQ

Date: 02 Nov 1998 11:22:17 -0500


Hi Craig......

That should be the Calthrop/Kitson 4-8-4T from the Barsi Light Railway
.....2-6 gauge. One of the turning points in Light Railway Development
as after Calthrop nothing was ever the same again....

Cheers

Iain
(currently writing the Biog of E.R. Calthrop including the Barsi system
amongst others)

Aerolite Booktraders
Railway Book Specialist
<A HREF="http://www.aerolite.u-net.com">http://www.aerolite.u-net.com</A>

From: Vivek Prakash <>

Subject: Re: New Zones

Date: 02 Nov 1998 13:09:14 -0500


I second that. I liked the 9 zones too - this makes matters just all
that more complicated. My question is, what sort of impact are these new
zones going to have on efficiency? Does this mean that more make up time
has to be added for trains transferring to and from these new zones?
Regards
Vivek

Madhav Acharya wrote:
>
> I thought they were already a reality ? Only the heads of each of
these
> zones
> is not a GM but an Officer on Special Duty (OSD) (info courtesy IR
> website). But
> the trappings that are part and parcel of a new zone are evident in
> Bangalore
> (South Western Railway). I liked the 9 zones too - adding more is
> equivalent
> to each person having their own stretch of track !
>
> Madhav
>

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Re: Thanks for the help!

Date: 02 Nov 1998 17:08:42 -0500


Lovely pics, keep them coming - WDM 2 as an object of art

Apurva

Madhav Acharya wrote:

> Hi Apurva
>
> I'm writing from Delaware, US. I scanned the pics
> and you can check them out at
>
> <A HREF="http://www.che.udel.edu/~acharya/trains.html">http://www.che.udel.edu/~acharya/trains.html</A>
>
> Happy viewing !
> Madhav

From: S.B.Mehta <>

Subject: I'm back

Date: 02 Nov 1998 18:28:41 -0500


Hi,

I have come back after a break of 12 days. Please renew/activate my
subscription on the mailing list.

Incidenatlly, I had been to Goa. Unlike a rail freak I flew both ways
as I was apprehensive about the conditions on the KR. I was given
some discouraging reports on the running conditions by some
travellers. Upon travelling in Goa I haapened to see some sections of
the KR ( bridges, sidings, et al) and the quality of work done
impressed me.

Viraf and I intend to take up a 'survey' trip some time early next
year.

Sarosh
======================
Sarosh Bakhtyar Mehta
M/s. Godrej & Boyce Mfg.Co.Ltd.
Machine Tool Division
Pirojshanagar, Vikhroli,
MUMBAI 400 079
INDIA
Tel:(Office) 577 3535 / 577 3636 Extn: 3917/3907/3909
Tel:(Residence) 389 3150
Fax:(Office) 91 22 517 2229 / 91 22 518 2289
Email sarosh@godrejnet.email
=======================
Wisdom dawns only after knowledge is gained

From: Dr. K.J. Walker & Mrs. M.E, Heath <>

Subject: Re: Homing at Chennai

Date: 02 Nov 1998 18:36:00 -0500


Hi Shankar,
I don't think the fireman has been called a stoker in Britain for
many
many years. Certainly he wasn't when I was a kid there in the 1940s. In
the
colonies, too, he's been a fireman for a very long time! I can't ever
remember seeing an Indian "restroom" either: always waiting room or
retiring
room (where sleeping facilities were available) as far as I can recall.
(I've always thought calling a lavatory a restroom was the height of
NorteAmericano mealymouthedness anyway -- don't wear out the springs on
the
sofa, folks!)
Cheers
Ken Walker

-----Original Message-----
From: Shankar <shankie@emirates.email
To: Anne Ogborn <anniepoo@netmagic.email
Cc: irfca@cs.email <irfca@cs.email
Date: Tuesday, 3 November 1998 4:02
Subject: Re: Homing at Chennai


>Hello,
>Talking of typical American terms, somemore spring to mind:
>
>Indian: dining car: U.S.: Diner
> shunting engine: (road) switcher
> sleeper (car) sleeping car
> sleeper: tie
> coupling: coupler
> CBC coupling: buck eye coupler
> engine: locomotive
> loco shed: roundhouse
> loco foreman: roundhouse foreman
> bogie (wheel set): truck
> level crossing railroad crossing
> bogie (compartment) car
> wagon freight car
> engine driver engineer to state a
few.
>
>Actually, the Brits played a major role in determining the
nomenclature.
>However, even they might not have bargained for certain Indianizations:
>
>like the British engines are manned by a driver and a stoker
> US engines have an engineer and a fireman.
>The IR has adapted this, and Indian trains have a driver and a fireman.
>
>One major erro in IR parlance is the cattle guard. (cowcatcher in US
lingo).
>This device is for removing large obstructions from the track, i.e.
pushing
them
> clear of the engine's path. It has nothing to do with cows or cattle
>whatsoever.
>
>Best regards.
>Shankar
>
>
>At 09:25 PM 11/1/98 -0800, you wrote:
>>
>>
>>Vdate@aol.email wrote:
>>
>>> rake is consist... a permanent set of coaches which forms a train
minus
the
>>> engine. Some other equivalent words are (American equivalent in
parenthesis)
>>> : driver (engineer), platform (track), hamal(redcap), diner (dining
>>> car),wc(restroom), restroom (waiting room),booking office (ticket
office),
>>> ring (call on phone). Readers, please add.
>>
>>US Indian
>>fireman asst. driver
>>porter kuli
>>car attendent guard
>>ticket taker TTE
>>based homed (sometimes "shopped", as in
"shopped
>out of
>>Bakersfield")
>>east/west up/down
>>car wagon/van
>>truck bogie
>>hired out inducted
>>
>>
>>Question - in the US there's an engineer (usually a very junior
engineer)
whose
>>job
>>is to move engines about the yard and roundhouse area. We call this
person
a
>>"hostler" - what's the equivilant Indian term?
>>
>>Also, what's the pointed iron grill on the lower front of a steam
engine
we
>call
>>a "pilot" or "cowcatcher" called?
>>My wallpaper's a WP4 that has one.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>

The content of the individual messages displayed here is subject to copyright by the original authors and may not be reproduced outside the context of IRFCA without permission.
Note: This site is not officially affiliated with Indian Railways! The official web site of Indian Railways is: http://www.indianrailways.gov.in
Site contact: webmaster@irfca.org
Copyright © 2010, IRFCA.org. About IRFCA  Contact Us  Search this site  Site Map  Links   Acknowledgements  Legal Information & Disclaimers