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From: BSR SHARMA <>

Subject: Re: Generator car question: More questions!

Date: 30 Sep 1998 13:33:29 -0500


---Vijay Balasubramanian <vijay_642@hotmail.email wrote:
> Repeating Pushkar's question, does this mean that a
stationary coach
> uses the batteries underneath to supply power to
the fans and lights,

Yes.

> and a coach in motion gets it from an alternator
attached to the
> axle-driven dynamo? I am, of course, talking about
a self-generating
> coach.

> Also, are the batteries being constantly recharged
while the
> coach is in motion? Please explain.
>

A coach in motion continues to get it from the
batteries which are being charged by the axle driven
DC dynamo. Think of it as a simple UPS
(Uninterruptible Power Supply) for a computer. This
is a simple parallel circuit without any
switching/cut-out etc. (This was all designed in 50's
or before - no electronics or reliable
electro-mechanicals of any kind!)

A simple observation will clarify this system: When a
train has remained stationary for a long time, the
lights start to dim (and fans start slowing/dying
down). When the train picks up speed the lights start
brightening and fans turn faster - indicating a
simple charge-discharge cycle.

B.S.R.Sharma


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From: Milind Thekedar <>

Subject: GREETINGS

Date: 30 Sep 1998 22:25:27 -0500



HI GANG

WISH YOU A VERY HAPPY DASHAHARA .

MILIND

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From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Lighting and AC system

Date: 30 Sep 1998 22:35:06 -0500




Vijay Balasubramanian wrote:

> Repeating Pushkar's question, does this mean that a stationary coach
> uses the batteries underneath to supply power to the fans and lights,

Yes that is correct. Careful observation would show a slight dimming of
lights and slowing in the fan's pitch when the coach comes to a rest -
you
can also observe the 'kick' when the charging system 'picks up' during
acceleration.

> and a coach in motion gets it from an alternator attached to the
> axle-driven dynamo?

The older coaches have a dynamo (maintenance intensive DC generator)
while
all the new coaches use brushless (virtually no maintenance) alternators
(AC generators - with a semiconductor rectifier and a solid state
charging
controller - the box that is slung near the bogies of a coach)



> BTW, the AC 3-tier coaches (on Rajdhani and others) use roof-mounted
AC
> units which are supposed to be lighter than what is used on other AC
> coaches. How do these AC units operate?

The AC units (made by a company known as 'Sidwal') are 'packaged' that
is
they are modular and are located on top of the toilet block. Each AC
unit
above the toilet has two hermetically sealed compressors and two fan
coil
units. They are attached to the AC ducts by bellows. Normally only one
of
these unit are working - the other is a standby or needed only in case
of
extreme summer heat. The advantage of these systems is replacement time
is
only 4 hours while in case of the older coach had the AC system built
in
the underside of the coach, which was detailed if the AC was faulty. I
suspect the reason the roof mounted AC was not available for such a long
time was that the electronic 'inverter' which converts 110 V DC of the
battery to 415 V AC, three phase for the AC unit is available only
recently. The efficient electronic switches used in these invertors
themselves are only a recent development. This inverter (usually made
by
Siemens) is located in the bulkhead near the first berth. If you ever
happen to get the berth you can hear the inverter cutting in and out as
per
the demand of the AC system. If you look carefully there is a three
phase
AC receptacle for 'pre cooling' near the coach buffer. This would allow
a
coach standing in a siding to be cooled without draining the battery.
As the roof mounted AC is modular and self contained there is less
chance
of leakage as compared to the long line of refrigerant which had to go
from
the underfloor compressor (in case of the older coach) to the fan coil
unit
located in the bulkhead (the older coaches had one less berth to
accommodate the bulky fan coil unit).
Finally as the new coached (AC 2 tier as well as AC 3 tier) have high
capacity toilet water tanks located underfloor and are required to be
pumped electrically to the fitting. One curious observation is that is
that
this pump is turned off when the coach is rewatered at some way side
station (like Mantralayam Road) Any idea why the pump is turned off
during
rewatering while it keeps running even if the coach is standing for a
long
time when waiting. The reason has nothing to do with the draining of the
batteries - I suspect something to do with the pump running dry due to
the
sloshing during filling and then losing the head. But then the pump is
located below the tank level and theoretically should be self priming -
the
coach attendant have no answers - they only follow procedures. It is
upto
the mighty IRFCA to answer these questions !

Apurva

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Optimum load on the Gensets

Date: 01 Oct 1998 06:56:46 -0500


Hi Gang!

I think if a train has a majority AC coaches like Rajdhani and Shatabdi
then a genset is a better idea, while a few AC coaches in a rake do not
justify a end on generator. The old (deep blue rake) Deccan Queen until
the 1980s used to have a end on generator cum brake cum ladies coach.
The DQ had no AC coaches in those days only luxurious 1st class chair
cars. But the rake was more or less permanent so it could have a genset.
Think of it this way - Genset means no batteries ! Which results in a
HUGE saving in material and maintenance costs.
One more factor I can think of : Whose responsibility is the genset
running and maintenance ? My guess is that the crew in charge of the
genset will go all the way to the end destination and return. This is
akin to the catering / AC staff who travel all the way. This could mean
that only Superfast trains with a fixed link will have a genset.
Many of the trains rakes in India seem to have a forward and reverse
triangular link - once a train rake reaches a destination it is renamed
and sent off as another direction. Once the train reaches that
destination it may come back to the original point of starting as yet
another train. Then it reverses these three journeys and comes back to
the home station as the up version of the first train. I can cite many
examples of this type of link. You can confirm these links by looking up
the train log which is available with the guard which lists these
journeys. This is one link which would NOT have a genset.

Apurva Bahadur

From: Julian.Rainbow <>

Subject: Mr Daboos book

Date: 01 Oct 1998 11:26:29 -0500


To you all,

My apologies for not replying to your questions earlier, but I have just
been on a boat without email for three weeks.

Mr Daboo's book can be obtained from the

British Overseas Railways Historical Trust
260 Wricklemarsh Road
Blackheath
London SE3 8DW

US cheques may be made payable to Dr P.E. Waters at the same address. I
will find the prices when I can get in my cabin at shift change. There
is
no email address for BORHT, but please contact me while I am on board
for
the next two weeks.

Yours

Julian

From: Vijay Balasubramanian <>

Subject: Articles from the web!

Date: 01 Oct 1998 11:52:54 -0500


Here are two articles that I found recently:

1) Pritish Nandy's opinion about the Tatkal reservation system.

<A HREF="http://www.rediff.com/news/dec/17nandy.htm">http://www.rediff.com/news/dec/17nandy.htm</A>


2) I didn't realize that IR had illegal railway stations. Read on...

<A HREF="http://www.the-week.com/97oct19/events1.htm">http://www.the-week.com/97oct19/events1.htm</A>


Vijay

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From: Julian.Rainbow <>

Subject: Hughes Indian Books

Date: 01 Oct 1998 12:06:34 -0500


The Publisher is the Contintental Railway Circle, 25 Woodcock Dell
Avenue,
Kenton, Harrow, Middlesex, HA3 0PW, England. Credit cards are NOT
accepted.

Julian

From: Dr. K.J. Walker & Mrs. M.E, Heath <>

Subject: Re: Generators and compressors (old technology)

Date: 01 Oct 1998 17:17:11 -0500


Hi everyone,
    Electric lighting for passenger trains dates back to the turn of the century. A number of systems were tried out, most based either on storage batteries (accumulators) or on some kind of generator. Most were either too cumbersome  or couldn't provide continuous power. Storage batteries required far too much space -- the London-Brighton line, only 50 miles long and taking 1hr for a semi-fast journey, actually had to dedicate special accumulator vans -- and were very heavy. As there were no practical internal combustion engines in those days, steam had to be used fo any generator system, but the drain was too great for a whole passenger train, especially given the small, unsuperheated, low-pressure steam engines then in general use. One small spin-off, though, was the small 24V (I think) turbine generator for loco lamps, etc, a common fitting on steam locomotives the world over. You can often hear those "singing" when standing next to a stationary engine.
     The electric lighting system which won out was Stones', made by J.Stone of Deptford, still a leading supplier of ancillary systems  for trains. A DC generator was hung from the underframe of the coach, and driven by a belt from the carriage axle. The generator was so suspended as to be self-tensioning, thus eliminating adjustment problems. (It's these small details that often make a design a winner!) The generator both supplied the lights (and other auxiliaries) on the carriage, and charged the batteries, at least when the train was running fast enough. The number of batteries needed in this system was of course far less than in a storage system, and these were generally carried in a battery box under the vehicle, parallel to the sides so as to provide easy access. It's the large rectangular box you can see below ordinary ICF and similar carriages.
     In Britain, head-end power came in, not to replace generator/battery lighting, but to replace steam heating. Early UK diseasels had special steam boilers so as to heat coaching stock equipped with steam heating, but soon the sensible thing was done and electrical heating was used on all new coaching stock. The ghastly ETHEL vans were used for providing electrical heat for frigid Pommy railfans on steam fantrips!
      In India, I think heating more or less came in simultaneously with AC?
    Finally, suburban electrics always took lighting and heat directly from the train line, and did not use generators or batteries. In the early days (1890s onwards) the normal trick was to run five 120-volt globes in series across the nominal 600-volt supply: common practice in tramway and suburban railway systems. The number of globes and choice of globe voltage was dictated by contemporary US practice, where domestic lifgting was 110-120 volts. Hence standard bulbs could be used. Oddly, this feature was made into a theft-proofing facility where domestic voltage was different! London Transport used to use five bulbs in series for headcodes, covering the unwanted ones with a shutter (you couldn't switch them individually, obviously) but in damp weather the shutters  -- external and cast-iron on the oldest cars -- would charge up, and staff touching them could get quite a jolt! The trend in recent years has been to use low voltages -- typically 50 -- for all auxiliary functions. This is partly an offshoot of technological development, as the PCM auto-acceleration system of the 1930s and the roughly contemporary electro-pneumatic brake both used low-voltage AC. Modern transistor/thyristor technology has made this a very easy direction to go.
    The "tack-a-tack-a-tack-a" sound you hear in suburban trains is the air compressor for the Westinghouse air brakes, not a generator. It cuts in automatically when the line pressure drops below a preset level.
     Hope all that helps!
           Ken Walker

From: Peter Mosse <>

Subject: India / Pakistan Rail Link - Official

Date: 01 Oct 1998 19:09:11 -0500


I spoke with Sartaj Aziz, Pakistan Minister for Foreign Affairs, this
evening.

What I said to him was this ... The Indo-Pakistan confidence-building
measures announced last week include some measures which from the point
of
view of a bystander such as myself (ie not Indian and not Pakistani)
seem
completely non-controversial, such as restoration of the Munabao /
Khokhropar railway link. What is the process involved in implementing
such
measures ? Have they been agreed, or are they merely part of an agenda
for
discussion - and is it necessary for the entire package to be agreed or
can
individual items be agreed and implemented incrementally ?

This was the response - and BTW I want to emphasize that I am NOT trying
to
politicize the list as I know all WE want is to see more trains running
to
more places in the subcontinent - and elsewhere.

The Foreign Minister said (unfortunately) that everything has to be seen
in
the context of the Kashmir question (what else is new!). The Pakistan
government is very concerned that the Indian government's objective with
these proposals is to spin out negotiations and divert attention from
making progress over Kashmir.

So the Pakistan government is saying that the Indian government is
saying
let's try to make some progress on these non-Kashmiri issues and then we
can have more confidence in each other in dealing with Kashmir, while
the
Pakistan government is saying we have to make some progress on Kashmir
before we can deal seriously with these other issues.

Anyway, the Indian Foreign Minister is going to Islamabad in two weeks'
time for dicsussions with Sartaj Aziz and, well, it doesn't look to me
as
if that rail link is going to be reopened just yet!

TOO BAD !!

Peter Mosse

From: Peter Mosse <>

Subject: Official IR Map - 1993

Date: 01 Oct 1998 19:11:53 -0500


I have just ONE of these maps left. Cost is $8.50 incl postage in US or
$10 incl postage elsewhere.

Contact me offlist if interested.

Peter Mosse

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Re: Generators and compressors (old technology)

Date: 01 Oct 1998 23:49:45 -0500


 

Dr. K.J. Walker & Mrs. M.E, Heath wrote: One small spin-off, though, was the small 24V (I think) turbine generator for loco lamps, etc, a common fitting on steam locomotives the world over. You can often hear those "singing" when standing next to a stationary engine.

I wish I could ! There are hardly any steam locos left in India, certainly none around us at Pune, but the word 'singing' brought back many memories.   Indian locos frequently had a naked lamp hanging near the injector under the cab to see the flow of the water in the overflow vent (correct word ?) when the boiler water level was adjusted. I think the injector also made a cheery singing sound.

Some of the Neral Matheran NG coaches have NO lighting while the newer coaches with the 'Greenhouse' windows have 'total loss' battery fed lighting.

      In India, I think heating more or less came in simultaneously with AC?

I do not know of  any Indian train with any form of heating. To the best of my knowledge there are no heated trains in India.

One more fact in this lighting and generator discussion - most IR passenger coaches have a connection post which allows coaches with weak / missing (they get stolen, you know - sometimes even when the train is moving slowly) batteries to draw current with their healthier neighbors.
Some of the EMUs and many mail / express trains have flashing tail lights.
One recent  observation is that some freight trains have started  using  electrical (vs older kerosene powered tail lights) tail lights, but I cannot guess the type of electrical connection - to have a 'total loss' system for something as critical as a tail light will be ridiculous. But then we are talking about the IR here  :-) !
In the 1980s one coach of the double decker Sinhagad Express between Pune - Mumbai was converted to photo voltaic cells - At what cost -dear friends ? Even today the photo voltaic lighting is used only to light the remote isloated stations, it is an extremely expensive idea. The entire roof the coach was covered by the photo voltaic panel.

Did you gang know that the batteries used for station duties (the route relay interlock etc) were periodically (say on a weekly basis)  replaced by the Signalling & Telecommunication staff by a freshly charged set. The fresh cells were carried from a larger station and distributed to smaller stations by a 'S&T' works special train or by the stopping passenger. This syetem is followed  in smaller stations which do not have electric connections nor a genset to charge the batteries. A lot of stations on the Pune - Kolhapur single line section (under South Central Rail's Hubli division) employ this type of 'total loss' electrical power.
Manpower intensive procedures !

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: More time tables available for reference

Date: 02 Oct 1998 00:04:07 -0500


Hi Gang !

Family visiting from Calcutta have got for me ER, NR and NEFR time
tables. They 'forgot' to give me the SER time table until yesterday. So
note these four time tables are available for reference over the
internet if any one want a detail.

Apurva Bahadur

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: IRFCA needs publicity

Date: 02 Oct 1998 02:49:19 -0500


Hi Gang,

Over the last so many days I have been thinking that the IRFCA needs
more publicity. I was thinking that I should send a letter to the editor
to the main newspapers in the four metros and any others I can list. I
want to inform the readers about the IRFCA and how to join/contribute.
Today a we collect members by word of mouth only.

We need to see more members from the 'Internet ready' places in India -
New Delhi, Calcutta, Hyderabad so many other B & C grade cities. As per
a recent advert in the Times of India the whole Madhya Pradesh has come
under the internet map at the district level. Can you imagine what sort
of HOT news we are going to get if we can rope in members from these
areas ?
I would like to actively harvest the Indian railfans who have
internet access (the number grows every day) and who find themselves all
alone with nobody to share their enthusiasm about the their interest.
I want to know if any railnut (specifically the 'elders' of the mailing
list) has any objections or suggest a guideline to my writing to the
editors about the IRFCA. Is there a maximum size that we can handle or
are there any people best left out of the IRFCA ?

Think about it.

Apurva Bahadur

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Re: Generator car question

Date: 02 Oct 1998 04:21:19 -0500


> We have these Bhajan Coaches in our Bombay Suburban trains. I for one
> avoid these coaches like plague. Its a cacophony and when you step out
of
> such coaches you are almost deaf. Instead of harmonium and tabla, we
have
> in Bombay Cymbals and for tabla the Bhajan mandli use the side panels
> - banging on them. Believe me whilst commuting during peak hours
> these mandlis are a nuisance.

Viraf,

Have you ever stood by the rail tracks (say at Khar road / Jogeshwari or
any 'slow train only' station) while an EMU with the Bhajan party goes
by at speed. The loud singing and banging makes you want to believe in
God. Since I do not live in Mumbai and not have to face this type of EMU
on a daily basis, I find the Bhajan party in the EMUs very interesting.
Our sylvan Pune sadly has no collection of such colourful and devoted
people. The Bhajan Mandalis seem to be more prevalent on the WR rather
than the CR, is that right Viraf ?

Apurva

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Dhaka Ajmer train ? International train lovers - rejoice !

Date: 02 Oct 1998 06:40:38 -0500


Hi Gang,

Here is a scan of the WR ad in the Times of India of 2nd Oct 1998. Some
regular news about the holiday special etc. Ram Naik mentions that
direct trains would link Dhaka to Ajmer and Lahore to Ajmer for the
'Urs' of the Ajmer Sharif is under consideration - Wow guys - God must
be listening to our wish list of true international trains. Can this be
done on a regular basis Mr. Naik ?
Go through the attachment and get back ASAP with your comments.

Apurva Bahadur

From: Pushkar Apte <>

Subject: "shob theke bhalo": bhajan madalis take note!

Date: 02 Oct 1998 06:54:08 -0500



INDIAN EXPRESS FRONT PAGE
Friday, October 2, 1998
Express Durga and devotees turn train into puja
[Image] pandal

[Image] PRESS TRUST OF INDIA
EIW ----------------------------
[Image] KHARAGPUR (ON BOARD FALUKNAMA EXPRESS), OCT 1:
Away from home and puja fun, about two
Market dozen Bengalis recreated the festive ambience
Indicators when they set up a makeshift pandal in a
[Image] second class compartment of
Screen Secunderabad-Howrah Falaknuma Express on
[Image] `Mahanavami' day.
Celebrity Chat Notwithstanding heavy showers which partially
[Image] flooded the compartments as the train
Express trundled through countryside West Bengal, the
Computers Calcuttans turned the fourth sleeper coach
[Image] into a mini abode of goddess Durga.
Express Power
[Image] It had all elements of a pandal -- a Durga
idol bedecked with flowers, a `katki' sari
Letters for the pandal covering, incense sticks, a
[Image] shloka chanting `pandit', a conch blowing
Advertisers maiden and above all the fervour associated
Forum with Mahanavami, the peak day of
[Image] celebrations.
[Image]
Express Careers ``Journey on navami is awful...,'' rued Amiya
[Image] Chakraborty, who had to undertake one on
official purpose. ``And that too away from
Business Forum Calcutta,'' he shook his head in despair.
[Image]
Match Maker It was Amiya who mooted the idea of building
[Image] a mini pandal, which was endorsed
unanimously.
Express
Properties The `team' wasfortunate enough to spot a
[Image] weary looking hawker selling Durga idols,
Palki - Travel flowers and garlands at Kharagpur station.
& Tours
[Image] Debashish Dutta, who was on his way back to
Information Calcutta from Puri, took out his travel
Technology souvenirs -- a conch shell and incense sticks
[Image] -- and a professional pandit, Mahadev Acharya
obliged with his religious talents. The puja
Astrosurf got going much to the excitement of all
[Image] passengers.
Eco-India
[Image] As word spread through the hawkers and pantry
Dr Know car staff, curious passengers from other
[Image] compartments lined up to catch a glimpse of
the unique pandal.
Morning Digest
[Image] They came, bowed their heads for prayer and
Express chatted excitedly about not having to miss
Greeting out on ``ma's'' blessings even when on a
[Image] journey.
Graffiti ``Isn't it wonderful... I was feeling so low
[Image] on having to be away from home during
Crossword pujas,'' said 52-year-old Devika Thakur who
[Image] was visiting her ailing daughter in Cuttack.
Drumbeat: Ad
Buzzaar The conches blew late into the night and no
one complained of the decibels. The younger
lot made merry with songs varying from
Bengali prayers to the latest `kuch kuchhota
hai' numbers.

And as the train crossed smaller shunting
stations in the wee hours of evening,
occasional blaring music and dazzling lights
from `real' pandals made way into the
compartments.

All heads turned, only momentarily, and the
fervour was multiplied by the inspiration
which they got from the gaudily done pandals.

But everyone felt the same as six year old
Ruchika Saha. ``Amader pandal shob theke
bhalo (our pandal is the best of them all),''
she chimed licking the `prasad' her mother
made from `chide', `doi' (puffed rice and
curd) and bananas.

It was winding up time as the train neared
its terminus Howrah. The idol was wrapped in
the sari -- flowers garlands et al -- and was
readied for immersion the next day.

``She will be immersed with my `para' idol
tomorrow,'' a jubilant Amiya, who like the
rest of the boarders, went home with an
experience to remember, said.

From: Vijay Balasubramanian <>

Subject: Re: Dhaka Ajmer train ? International train lovers - rejoice !

Date: 02 Oct 1998 07:20:50 -0500


>A function was held last week at Bandra Terminus to mark the naming >of

490814907 Bandra Terminus-Bikaner Express as 'Ranakpur Express'

There used to be an MG Ranakpur exp. which was introduced between ADI
and Marwar and later extended to Bikaner.


>and 970719708 Bandra Terminus-Jaipur Express as "Aravati Express.

IMHO, a typo. Should be the Aravali Exp. Started as the MG Jayanti
Janata Exp. between ADI and Delhi via Ringas chord and later renamed to
Aravali Exp.

Vijay

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From: skb <>

Subject: Re: IRFCA needs publicity

Date: 02 Oct 1998 07:29:28 -0500


> Over the last so many days I have been thinking that the IRFCA
needs
> more publicity. I was thinking that I should send a letter to the
editor
> to the main newspapers in the four metros and any others I can list. I
> want to inform the readers about the IRFCA and how to join/contribute.
> Today a we collect members by word of mouth only.
>
> We need to see more members from the 'Internet ready' places in India
-
> New Delhi, Calcutta, Hyderabad so many other B & C grade cities. As
per
> a recent advert in the Times of India the whole Madhya Pradesh has
come
> under the internet map at the district level. Can you imagine what
sort
> of HOT news we are going to get if we can rope in members from these
> areas ?
> I would like to actively harvest the Indian railfans who have
> internet access (the number grows every day) and who find themselves
all
> alone with nobody to share their enthusiasm about the their interest.
> I want to know if any railnut (specifically the 'elders' of the
mailing
> list) has any objections or suggest a guideline to my writing to the
> editors about the IRFCA. Is there a maximum size that we can handle or
> are there any people best left out of the IRFCA ?
>
> Think about it.

I am one of the mostly silent members of the IRFCA. I also happen to be
the
editor of Parabaas, which we proudly proclaim as the First Complete
Bengali
Webzine :). (It's in Bengali, but if possible, please do come and visit
us
at www.parabaas.com and give us your comments.)

An article on IRFCA, its raison d'etre, its immediate and future goals,
how
it wants to involve people from everywhere, how it operates, etc. and
the
role of e-mails and internet as enablers would be something of interest
to
the Parabaas editors. Of course, we prefer that it is written in
Bengali, but
we had published some articles after translating from English also. Some
additional focus on West Bengal and/or Bangladesh would also be nice
from our
viewpoint.

Of course, I would like to take this opportunity to invite the writers
in
you to submit (unpublished) articles to Parabaas, whether or not related
to
the Railways.

Regards,

Samir Bhattacharya

PS: We do publish "letters (even if it is in English) to the editors"..
in
that case, Apurva, you can just add an emphasis on roping in enthusiasts
from Bengalis everywhere. The specific url that will get you to that
page
will be:

www.parabaas.com/BORSHA2/NOFRAME/LEKHA7/someepeshu.html

> Apurva Bahadur

From: Jishnu Mukerji <>

Subject: Re: Dhaka Ajmer train ? International train lovers - rejoice !

Date: 02 Oct 1998 08:08:00 -0500


> Hi Gang,
>
> Here is a scan of the WR ad in the Times of India of 2nd Oct 1998.
Some
> regular news about the holiday special etc. Ram Naik mentions that
> direct trains would link Dhaka to Ajmer and Lahore to Ajmer for the
> 'Urs' of the Ajmer Sharif is under consideration - Wow guys - God must
> be listening to our wish list of true international trains. Can this
be
> done on a regular basis Mr. Naik ?

Dhaka - Ajmer, would surely in reality be something like Goalondo -
Ajmer, since it is a tad difficult to get to Dhaka from this side of
Padma.

I heard a rumor that there is now a daily bus that runs from Calcutta to
Dhaka (any truth in that rumor - anyone from Calcutta?), and that
restoration of train service from Calcutta to Bangladesh is under
consideration. Looks like, if all goes well and political tempers remain
tempered we might get the old East Bengal Mail, East Bengal Express and
Barisal Express (or at least one of them) back again! I suspect that if
this happens the first one to get restored will be Calcutta - Goalondo
with connecting ferry/bus to Dhaka.

Jishnu.

From: Anne Ogborn <>

Subject: Re: Generators and compressors (old technology)

Date: 02 Oct 1998 08:10:12 -0500




Apurva Bahadur wrote:

>
>
> Dr. K.J. Walker & Mrs. M.E, Heath wrote: One small spin-off, though,
> was the small 24V (I think) turbine generator for loco lamps, etc, a
> common fitting on steam locomotives the world over. You can often hear
> those "singing" when standing next to a stationary engine.
>
> I wish I could ! There are hardly any steam locos left in India,
> certainly none around us at Pune, but the word 'singing' brought back
> many memories. Indian locos frequently had a naked lamp hanging near
> the injector under the cab to see the flow of the water in the
> overflow vent (correct word ?) when the boiler water level was
> adjusted. I think the injector also made a cheery singing sound.
>

Wow - what a thing to model!
I used to run live steam. I sure miss that whiny sound of a working
injector. Missed it even more when I was low on water, had a run to
make, and the !*^&$!@ injector wouldn't take! Injectors are one of the
most trouble prone parts of an engine.


>
> Some of the Neral Matheran NG coaches have NO lighting while the newer
> coaches with the 'Greenhouse' windows have 'total loss' battery fed
> lighting.

What's meant by "total loss" lighting?

>
>
>> In India, I think heating more or less came in simultaneously
>> with AC?
>
> I do not know of any Indian train with any form of heating. To the
> best of my knowledge there are no heated trains in India.
>

I was traveling about India in the cold snap last december. I *KNOW*
for a fact IR has no heated trains!

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