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From: Sridhar_Shankarnarayan <Sridhar_Shankarnarayan@fcbbs.email

Subject: Re: Remote signalling for Amtrak ???

Date: 19 Jun 1998 20:41:00 -0500


Sanjiv writes ...

Regarding the recent accident involving a commuter train and Amtrak in
Silver Springs, Maryland over the weekend, I heard on CNN that the
NTSB investigators will be questioning the "track controller" based in
Jacksonville FL !!.

Most commuter railroads run on tracks owned by the freight railroads. In the
above case the train was on CSX tracks controlled from Jacksonville, FL.
Similarly Union Pacifics operations are controlled from Omaha, BN's from fort
Worth TX and so on. Technology does take some of the fun out of these things.

Sridhar Shankar

From: S Pai <pai>>

Subject:

Date: 19 Jun 1998 20:41:00 -0500


I think this message made it just to me and not to the whole list, so
I'm forwarding it.

-Satish

> Hi,
>
> I was just getting a bit curious about the railway reservation system
> being maintained by the Indian Railways.
>
> Would you be having any idea as to what is the underlying Database
> model (i.e. Hierarchical, Network or Relational), who has implemented
> this system (I heard that it was done by CMC but I am not too sure).
> and finally what has it been implemented in.
>
> Thank you.
>
> Srinivas Rao Kanagala
> (srk3@ra.email

From: S Pai <pai>>

Subject: Asea Brown-Boveri + Daimler-Benz

Date: 19 Jun 1998 20:41:00 -0500


Some more on the merger of these two companies and their proposals for
operating in India. The merged company is called "Adtranz", and it
has already set up a subsidiary in India, "Adtranz India, Ltd."
Adtranz plans to manufacture electrical components, and signalling and
traffic control systems for IR in India. For this it is investing
about US$ 5-7 million to set up a plant in Baroda.

It also expects to have a role in modernizing CLW, and looking beyond
the ABB deal for 33 locos, it expects to be supplying IR with about 50
locos a year (that will be a good fraction of the 300 or so [is this
figure about right?] locos that IR needs annually).

-Satish

From: AUROPREM KANDASWAMI <auro@ix.email

Subject: Re: "India, No problem Sahib !"

Date: 19 Jun 1998 20:41:00 -0500


Hi folks,

I am planning to visit India this summer. I want to get this
much-talked about book "at any cost". So, if someone who recently
acquired this treasure, could just post the name and address of the
book store, where he luckily spot it, that would be a great help
that he would be rendering to a fellow IR fan.

Thanks,
Auro


PS : Does anyone have a close guess as to who will be the next,
lucky Railway Mantriji (Railway Cabinet Minister) in the
new Lok Sabha ?

Probably, Shri. Suresh Kalmadi .. ?

From: Sharon Lee <termy@uk.email

Subject: Double heading

Date: 19 Jun 1998 20:41:00 -0500


I travelled on the 2626 Kerela Exp all the way from Delhi to Trivandrum on
10/10/92.

It was hauled by an electric as far as Salem (I think) which was then
replace by 17636 and 17581. These took the train as far as Palghat where it
split with one half going to Mangalore and the other going to Trivandrum. I
assume it was double headed because of it's length - even after it split
the Trivandrum half was approx. 15 coaches in length. I seem to remember
the Mangalore section being about 10 coaches long. The seperate sections
were hauled by single locos , 18318 on the Trivandrum portion.

Simon Darvill

From: J.J. Rainbow <J.J.Rainbow@newcastle.email

Subject: New Indian Book

Date: 19 Jun 1998 20:41:00 -0500


The latest edition of Hugh Hughes' books on
Indian Locomotives has just been published. It
covers all locos built between 1941 and 1990.
It is available from the Continental railway
Circle, 25 Woodcock Dell Avenue, Kenton, Harrow,
Middlsex at a cost of pounds sterling 10.95,
postage is extra. I will try to review it in the
future.

Julian

From: AUROPREM KANDASWAMI <auro@ix.email

Subject: Re: Latest railway accident

Date: 19 Jun 1998 20:41:00 -0500


LUCKNOW, April 18:

60 die, 100 hurt in train mishap near Gorakhpur

The Gorakhpur-Gonda passenger train rammed into a stationary
goods train at Domingarh railway station.

More details awaited




- Auro

From: Dr. K.J. Walker & Mrs. M.E. Heath <kjw_meh@powerup.email

Subject: Re: Couplings and that

Date: 19 Jun 1998 10:57:00 -0500


Hi Apurva,
Good about the pictures. My photos show the Matheran couplers to be a
kind of centre-buffer-plus-link arrangement, though apparently not -- as
someone else suggested -- actually a rudder coupling like Darjeeling. Barsi
Light of course has Jones type choppers.
"Shaku" Couplers: I'm open to correction, but I think thse are
actually Scharfenberg couplers, which are increasingly adopted worldwide
for electric rail multiple-unit work. You'll also see them in Germany on
railcars and trams. They're a centre-buffer type designed to form a rigid
bar between the vehicles whn couple, and, as you say, to "make" the
electrical and air connections in one movement. You can identify them by
the fact that the face is rectangular in the horizontal plane, with
semicircular ends, and a large round pin projects, to mate with a hole on
the opposite coupler. There was an earlier type of "all-in-one" coupler
called a Tomlinson, and much used on trams and interurban cars in North
America. It is rectangular and has a projecting rectangular pin rather like
a blunt hook; the air/electrical connections are at the sides. If any
readers are in Toronto, they can inspect them on the PCCs ther; Boston has
similar ones. LOndon Transport used a much heavier version based on the
same principle, (typically) redsignated the "Wedglock". It's still in use.
Transition couplers were/are used practically wherever railways
were/are changing to MCBs. Most Australian lines used a chain on top, but
the British used a "drophead" type (SR, LNER, BR) which folded down to
reveal an ordinary coupling hook; used on passenger stock with Pullman
vestibules. I'm not a railwayman so I know very little about the use and
abuse of couplers: perhaps some of you out there can tell us some stories.
At a later date I'll describe link-and-pin, but as they were little
used outside the Americas, they're not of great importance to this
discussion.
Cheers
KJ
----------
> Hi Jayant & KJ,
>
> I will try and put up pictures of the couplers used on the NG locos - the
ZDM
> 4A of Barsi Light Railway and the NDM 1 of the Matheran Railway. There is
also
> a 'Snaku' (or is it 'Shaku'?) coupler used in between the coaches of EMUs
and
> DMUs. I remember reading somewhere that this pipe like coupler of the EMU
> couples the coaches as well as the brake hoses automatically.
> Also discuss the 'larger' CBC and the smaller 'transition' coupler found
in
> the
> four wheeler CRT and CRC wagons. Please mention the correct procedure of
> coupling - the coupling is held open by pushing the jaw of the CBC
manually
> and
> then the two rakes are pushed against each other causing them to lock.
Then a
> pin is inserted to keep the coupler from opening while manually coupling
the
> air hoses. The cranked handle which comes out on the side of the rake is
used
> only during uncoupling. Is this the correct procedure ? What happens if
two
> wagons are brought against each other with the CBC closed, does it open
> automatically on being forced against each other ?
> I have seen loose shunting at Daund and it is a very nerve wracking and
> dangerous procedure. I have seen a standing air braked LPG tank wagon
(with
> "not to be loose shunted' written on it), jump in the air a few inches
when it
> collided with the rest of the rake which was moving slowly. Then there is
the
> man who gets in between the still moving rake to couple the hoses etc. He
does
> that while walking backwards.
>
>
> Apurva Bahadur
>
> Dr. K.J. Walker & Mrs. M.E. Heath wrote:
>
> > Hi Sank,
> > Yes, quite a few lines, at least in German-speaking countries or
those
> > using German technology, had the type of centre buffer with side screw
> > chains that you mention. Certainly the Harz metre-gauge lines have it,
and
> > so does the Achenseebahn rack line in Austria. Note that the chain
sections
> > are attached to bars pivoting in those slots in the coupler body, thus
> > accomodating curvature because the whole assembly can "track" changes in
> > angle between the coupled vehicles.
> > New Zealand followed UK NG practice in originally using "Norwegian"
or
> > chopper couplers but I think they have now moved to MCB. You can
recognise
> > choppers by the circular or square face with a slot coming down half-way
> > from the top.
> > There is another type of coupler in use on many Indian NG lines,
namely
> > the ABC Patent Coupling. This was greatly favoured by the GIP and the
lines
> > it controlled, such as Arvi-Pulgaon, Achalpulpur-Murtijapur-Yavatmal,
> > Daund-Baramati, etc. It is quite complex, involving a revolving disk
which
> > latches onto a horizontal loop projectijng from the mating coupler. It
can
> > be recognised by the oval front plate with a very wide opening in the
upper
> > part of it. Its advantage is that, unlike the chopper, it is
double-ended,
> > so the orientation of the vehicles is unimportant. (Assam, e.g., used to
> > have its MG stock the other way round from the rest of India, so every
> > train had to reverse at Siliguri after the Assam rail link was built.)
> > Apropos "UP" and "DOWN," the English convention was that trains
going
> > TO London were UP, from London DOWN. That was widely adopted elsewhere.
In
> > India. the Great Indian Peninsula Railway therefore adopted UP for
trains
> > TO Bombay (hence the anomaly of UP trains descending the ghats).
Similarly,
> > the Madras Railway made Madras UP, The East Indian Railway (later ER),
> > however, made Calcutta DOWN, not UP. I believe the reason was that
> > originally it was intended that the GIP would run all the way to
Calcutta
> > (hence the name) and so Bombay was made UP with Calcutta DOWN. The EIR,
> > when it was formed, adopted the same convention. The same applied to
the
> > Bengal-Nagpur Railway (later SER) It also meant that on the North
Western
> > Railway (later the westernnpart of the NR) Up was to the west, all the
way
> > to the Khyber. Modern NR trains therefore go UP to Delhi, but continue
UP
> > to Amritsar, from where Delhi is DOWN! In the Australian States,
> > incidentally, the State capital was always UP, because the railways were
> > owned by the States, not the Commonwealth, and so your Melbourne-Sydney
> > train was DOWN to Albury (the break of gauge until 1962) and then UP to
> > Sydney after that.
> > Hope that all helps.
> > Cheers KJ
> > ----------
> > > > Some European and UK narrow-gauge railways actually went to a centre
> > > > buffer, with a link coupler slung either above or below it.
> > > I was looking at some pictures of Rhaetian Railway stock: looks like
> > > a centre buffer with two links on either side, passing through
> > > notches in the buffer. Is this yet another type ?
> > > > the JONES coupler...
> > > What type are the NZ railway couplers ? Looks like a circular
> > > central buffer with a notch on top.
> > > > Darjeeling uses a unique "rudder" coupling....
> > > Something similiar on the Matheran Railway, I think.
> > >
> > > That was an amazing amount of information: thanks a lot !
> > >
> > > --
> > > Jayant S : ID Studio
> > > Tata Technologies India Limited
> > > Telco Premises : Pimpri TEL: 91 (212) 774261 ex 2534
> > > PUNE : 411 018 : INDIA FAX: 91 (212) 773191
> > >
>
>
>
>
>
>

From: Shrinivas Bhatwadekar <>

Subject: Re: New trains and facilities

Date: 16 Jun 1998 21:53:13 -0500


---Auroprem Kandaswami <kandaswa@apple.email wrote:

> Time saver
>
> From August 1, the Nizamuddin-Mangalore Mangla Express will
> be re-routed to run via the Konkan Railways and will be
> extended to Ernakulam.
>
> The diversion will make the journey 14 hours shorter.
>

So after N.Delhi-Trivandrum Rajdhani Exp. which was to the Western /
Konkan Rly. route from April 1st this year,Mangala Exp. becomes the
second train to be re-routed.

I recently travelled by Mangala Exp.in Madhya Pradesh ( between Beena
& Bhopal) & we just discussed that this train will probably not run on
this route in near future.

The following trains are also likely candidates for re-routing :

1. Kerala Exp.
2. Navayug/Himasagar Exp.
3. H.Nizamudding-Goa Exp. ( possibly ?? )
4. Ahmedabad/Rajkot-Trivandrum Exp. ( ?? )

-- shrinivas
_________________________________________________________
DO YOU YAHOO!?
Get your free @yahoo.com address at <A HREF="http://mail.yahoo.com">http://mail.yahoo.com</A>

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: New MG diesel webpage

Date: 17 Jun 1998 05:40:48 -0500


Hi Gang !

Check out my new webpage on MG diesels at Miraj. This is a temp webpage
till I can integrate it with my indexed site elsewhere.
<A HREF="http://members.tripod.com/~ApuB/Mg_Diesel_at_MRJ.htm">http://members.tripod.com/~ApuB/Mg_Diesel_at_MRJ.htm</A>

Watch out for my MG steam loco webpage which will be up tonight once I
debug the HTML.

Your comments are required

Apurva Bahadur

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: My new MG steam loco webpage

Date: 17 Jun 1998 07:27:45 -0500


Hi dear Friends,

Please go through my MG steam locos at Miraj page. I know it is long
with 20 pics, but it is temperory. My need to talk to you and share my
pictures is stronger than designing a good layout. So please bear with
me and let me have your comments on the page.

Please go to: <A HREF="http://members.tripod.com/~ApuB/Mg_steam_at_MRJ.htm">http://members.tripod.com/~ApuB/Mg_steam_at_MRJ.htm</A>

Apurva Bahadur

From: Karthik Raju <>

Subject: Re: New trains and facilities

Date: 17 Jun 1998 10:12:14 -0500



>So after N.Delhi-Trivandrum Rajdhani Exp. which was to the Western /
>Konkan Rly. route from April 1st this year,Mangala Exp. becomes the
>second train to be re-routed.
>
>The following trains are also likely candidates for re-routing :
>
>1. Kerala Exp.
>2. Navayug/Himasagar Exp.

so, if this were to happen in the future,
looks like there won't be any direct
train for those between shoranur and arakkonam
to go to delhi and other popular destinations
on that route. what are the alternatives?
also, for those between shoranur and arakkonam,
is kanyakumari-bombay the only train
to go to bombay?

-karthik.
>3. H.Nizamudding-Goa Exp. ( possibly ?? )
>4. Ahmedabad/Rajkot-Trivandrum Exp. ( ?? )
>
>-- shrinivas


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at <A HREF="http://www.hotmail.com">http://www.hotmail.com</A>

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Re: Signs next to the tracks

Date: 17 Jun 1998 10:53:54 -0500


Hi Sachin,

The incipient footplater in you should grab this opportunity ! Don't ask
me -
ask the driver, my guess is that they will be delighted in a smart
inquisitive
young man who has so much to ask. This is how footplating starts - a
genuine
interest. You will be overwhelmed by the amount that there is to learn
in the
railways. Just make a trip to the station and ask questions. You have
something
to offer in return - the knowlege of internet.
T stands for Termination of speed limit (earlier a few kms before you
should
have noticed a speed limit board with a 50 or something written on it.
Once the
loco clears this board the last coach has already crossed the speed
limited
section and hence the driver can resume his 'booked speed'. As the
lengths of
the passenger and freight trains are different there are two 'end of
limit'
boards like TP (passenger) and TG (goods).
I am not able to understand the C & P boards and the smaller C & G
boards as
well. You will notice the W/L (whistle for level crossing) and its hindi
equivalent (See/Pha - seetee bajao - phatak hai). Also the signs on the
ground
level with a number and an arrow like 1000 ^. This means that the next
1000
meters is up slope. Our expert drivers make full use of the gradients to
gain
speed to help the train up a slope while saving fuel. Only a footplate
ride will
convince you of the tremendous expertise that a driver possesses.
You will also see a rectangular reflective board with a circle and two
horizontal lines - this is the sighting board, meaning that there is a
signal
ahead. You may also notice arrow heads pointing to the left or right.
These are
indicator to special restriction on the track.
Please tell us about trains in your section. Which trains work your
section,
which locos, homing to which sheds. Freight movements, contents of the
freight,
signaling system, connection of Trissur to the rest of the country -
anything.
Lack of information is what makes the study of Indian Railway so
fascinating and
frustrating at the same time. Only a rail fan staying in that area or
one who
has seen the section in detail can explain the intricacies. There
always are
intricacies even in the plainest of railway sections. I await your
reply.

Apurva Bahadur

Sachin P Keshavan wrote:

> Hi everybody,
> Since there are lot of foot platers around here, can any one
help me
> find the meaning of the following symbols. They appear on the left
hand
> side of the track (the assistant driver's side), usually placed a
little
> high and painted on a yellow board.
> 1. T (painted on a yellow circular board)
> 2. T/P and T/G (painted on a yellow circular board)
> 3. C (painted on a yellow diamond shaped board)
> 4. P (painted on a yellow diamond shaped board)
> Then there are also some characters painted on small white
circular
> boards and fixed on the Signal poles. I have seen boards with the
> letters 'C' and 'G'. Can any body explain the significance of all
these
> symbols.
>
> Bye,
> Sachin.P.K
> sachin_pk@hotmail.email
> Home Page: <A HREF="http://209.67.19.99/~sachin_pk">http://209.67.19.99/~sachin_pk</A>
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at <A HREF="http://www.hotmail.com">http://www.hotmail.com</A>

From: Prakash Tendulkar <>

Subject: Signs

Date: 17 Jun 1998 13:55:43 -0500


3. C (painted on a yellow diamond shaped board)

In suburban section of WR, I had seen C painted on diamond
shaped white board. It meant "coasting". Assuming Motorman
starts EMU by turning Master Controller straight into
parallel position (letting automatic circuitry to go through
series and series parallel positions and notches in them),
the train would gather enough momentum to coast from that sign
upto the next station in booked time. In reality, it worked
only during off peak periods.

Prakash

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Re: Couplings and that

Date: 17 Jun 1998 19:40:25 -0500


Hi Jayant & KJ,

I will try and put up pictures of the couplers used on the NG locos -
the ZDM
4A of Barsi Light Railway and the NDM 1 of the Matheran Railway. There
is also
a 'Snaku' (or is it 'Shaku'?) coupler used in between the coaches of
EMUs and
DMUs. I remember reading somewhere that this pipe like coupler of the
EMU
couples the coaches as well as the brake hoses automatically.
Also discuss the 'larger' CBC and the smaller 'transition' coupler found
in the
four wheeler CRT and CRC wagons. Please mention the correct procedure
of
coupling - the coupling is held open by pushing the jaw of the CBC
manually and
then the two rakes are pushed against each other causing them to lock.
Then a
pin is inserted to keep the coupler from opening while manually coupling
the
air hoses. The cranked handle which comes out on the side of the rake
is used
only during uncoupling. Is this the correct procedure ? What happens if
two
wagons are brought against each other with the CBC closed, does it open
automatically on being forced against each other ?
I have seen loose shunting at Daund and it is a very nerve wracking and
dangerous procedure. I have seen a standing air braked LPG tank wagon
(with
"not to be loose shunted' written on it), jump in the air a few inches
when it
collided with the rest of the rake which was moving slowly. Then there
is the
man who gets in between the still moving rake to couple the hoses etc.
He does
that while walking backwards.


Apurva Bahadur

Dr. K.J. Walker & Mrs. M.E. Heath wrote:

> Hi Sank,
> Yes, quite a few lines, at least in German-speaking countries or
those
> using German technology, had the type of centre buffer with side screw
> chains that you mention. Certainly the Harz metre-gauge lines have it,
and
> so does the Achenseebahn rack line in Austria. Note that the chain
sections
> are attached to bars pivoting in those slots in the coupler body, thus
> accomodating curvature because the whole assembly can "track" changes
in
> angle between the coupled vehicles.
> New Zealand followed UK NG practice in originally using
"Norwegian" or
> chopper couplers but I think they have now moved to MCB. You can
recognise
> choppers by the circular or square face with a slot coming down
half-way
> from the top.
> There is another type of coupler in use on many Indian NG lines,
namely
> the ABC Patent Coupling. This was greatly favoured by the GIP and the
lines
> it controlled, such as Arvi-Pulgaon, Achalpulpur-Murtijapur-Yavatmal,
> Daund-Baramati, etc. It is quite complex, involving a revolving disk
which
> latches onto a horizontal loop projectijng from the mating coupler. It
can
> be recognised by the oval front plate with a very wide opening in the
upper
> part of it. Its advantage is that, unlike the chopper, it is
double-ended,
> so the orientation of the vehicles is unimportant. (Assam, e.g., used
to
> have its MG stock the other way round from the rest of India, so every
> train had to reverse at Siliguri after the Assam rail link was built.)
> Apropos "UP" and "DOWN," the English convention was that trains
going
> TO London were UP, from London DOWN. That was widely adopted
elsewhere. In
> India. the Great Indian Peninsula Railway therefore adopted UP for
trains
> TO Bombay (hence the anomaly of UP trains descending the ghats).
Similarly,
> the Madras Railway made Madras UP, The East Indian Railway (later
ER),
> however, made Calcutta DOWN, not UP. I believe the reason was that
> originally it was intended that the GIP would run all the way to
Calcutta
> (hence the name) and so Bombay was made UP with Calcutta DOWN. The
EIR,
> when it was formed, adopted the same convention. The same applied to
the
> Bengal-Nagpur Railway (later SER) It also meant that on the North
Western
> Railway (later the westernnpart of the NR) Up was to the west, all the
way
> to the Khyber. Modern NR trains therefore go UP to Delhi, but continue
UP
> to Amritsar, from where Delhi is DOWN! In the Australian States,
> incidentally, the State capital was always UP, because the railways
were
> owned by the States, not the Commonwealth, and so your
Melbourne-Sydney
> train was DOWN to Albury (the break of gauge until 1962) and then UP
to
> Sydney after that.
> Hope that all helps.
> Cheers KJ
> ----------
> > > Some European and UK narrow-gauge railways actually went to a
centre
> > > buffer, with a link coupler slung either above or below it.
> > I was looking at some pictures of Rhaetian Railway stock: looks like
> > a centre buffer with two links on either side, passing through
> > notches in the buffer. Is this yet another type ?
> > > the JONES coupler...
> > What type are the NZ railway couplers ? Looks like a circular
> > central buffer with a notch on top.
> > > Darjeeling uses a unique "rudder" coupling....
> > Something similiar on the Matheran Railway, I think.
> >
> > That was an amazing amount of information: thanks a lot !
> >
> > --
> > Jayant S : ID Studio
> > Tata Technologies India Limited
> > Telco Premises : Pimpri TEL: 91 (212) 774261 ex 2534
> > PUNE : 411 018 : INDIA FAX: 91 (212) 773191
> >

From: John Hinson <>

Subject: Indian Railway Signalling

Date: 18 Jun 1998 05:39:01 -0500


Hi there,

I understand from a friend of mine in India that you have a mailing list
about Indian railway signalling? I wondered if I might be permitted to
subscribe.

I run the UK's only signalling web site, which although primarily about
British signalling, does have a small section devoted to signalling in
India. I would very much like to obtain some scanned photographs of the
old Indian signalling for the site.

Thank you.
--
John Hinson

________||_
/ \ at
/_____________\
|___________| The Signal Box
| | | | |
|__|__|__|__| <A HREF="http://trainweb.com/signalbox/">http://trainweb.com/signalbox/</A>
/| |
//| ===== |
// | |
|/ |_ _ _ _ |
--- o ---

From: Apurva Bahadur <>

Subject: Mail for David Bloyed

Date: 18 Jun 1998 10:27:40 -0500


Hello everyone,

Sorry for using the IRFCA to send a 'one to one' message to David
Bloyed, but the mail I
sent on his address bounced, so maybe he will ge the message now. It is
about his
planned visit to Jhansi.

Apurva Bahadur

Mail Delivery Subsystem wrote:

> ----- Transcript of session follows -----
> While talking to mail.airmail.net:
> >>> MAIL From:<iti@giaspn01.email
> <<< 550 Stop spamming. Bulk Email = Business Suicide.
> 554 <dbloyed@airmail.email... Remote protocol error
>
> ----- Unsent message follows -----
> Received: from [202.54.10.88] by giaspn01.vsnl.net.in;
(5.65/1.1.8.2/20Feb96-0821PM)
> id AA01917; Fri, 19 Jun 1998 11:17:21 +0500
> Message-Id: <3589FA17.52D7AAAF@giaspn01.email
> Date: Fri, 19 Jun 1998 11:11:43 +0530
> From: Apurva Bahadur <iti@giaspn01.email
> X-Mailer: Mozilla 4.04 [en] (Win95; I)
> Mime-Version: 1.0
> To: David Bloyed <dbloyed@airmail.email
> Subject: Re: Jhansi India
> References: <3.0.3.32.19980618235630.0068bdd0@mail.email
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
> Hi David,
>
> The problem is that the internet is not available at Jhansi yet, it
will take a
> few years. Okay, by a good stroke of luck I found out yesterday that
the Public
> Relations Officer of Pune Mr. Y.K. Singh was the PRO of Jhansi before
he was
> transferred to Pune. Please send me the questions you have for him
about
> Jhansi and I will forward them to him. I will also upload his reply to
you.
> There will be a gap of a few days before I can meet him and convey his
reply to
> you. Please send me an email addressed to Y.K. Singh (PRO, Pune
Division,
> Central Railways) and I will instantly forward your note to him.
>
> Let me know if there is anything else I can do for you in Pune.
>
> Apurva Bahadur
>
> David Bloyed wrote:
>
> > As I recieved no reply to the eamil below, I suppose no one in the
IRFCA
> > lives in Jhansi India. Does any member know a person living in
Jhansi that
> > I can contact with questions about the railroads there?
> >
> > > Does anyone in the IRFCA live in or near Jhansi India. If so,
email me.
> > I would like to discuss Jhansi with you.

From: Iain A Fraser <>

Subject: Barsi Light Railway

Date: 18 Jun 1998 11:01:45 -0500


Hi folks....

Can someone bring me up to date with the regauging program for the Barsi
Line. I am doing very detailed research into the line with a view to
publication and am always intrested in whats happening out there.
I am hoping to visit soon and am hoping to have up to the minute info
before I come out.
Any help appreciated

Iain
Aerolite Booktraders
Rail Book Specialist
<A HREF="http://www.aerolite.u-net.com">http://www.aerolite.u-net.com</A>

From: sank <>

Subject: Re: Siliguri/MG Couplings etc.

Date: 18 Jun 1998 20:28:06 -0500


> (Assam, e.g., used to
> have its MG stock the other way round from the rest of India, so
every
> train had to reverse at Siliguri after the Assam rail link was
built.)
I think Assam had reversed stock BECAUSE of the peculiar layout
of Siliguri Junction. Earlier, the MG line from the south used
to terminate at Siliguri Town, and the DHR NG line started from there.
A little further, the Kalimpong line brached off to the right and
still further, the Kishanganj NG line went left. I think SGU Jn lies
at what used to be this point; the Kishanganj line became the MG
line to Katihar, and a straight MG line was built through Sevoke
to Gauhati. Just outside Siliguri, this line is crossed by the
DHR proceeding to Darjeeling.

Fascinating histories.....

--
Jayant S : ID Studio
Tata Technologies India Limited
Telco Premises : Pimpri TEL: 91 (212) 774261 ex 2534
PUNE : 411 018 : INDIA FAX: 91 (212) 773191

From: David Bloyed <>

Subject: Jhansi India

Date: 18 Jun 1998 21:56:30 -0500


As I recieved no reply to the eamil below, I suppose no one in the IRFCA
lives in Jhansi India. Does any member know a person living in Jhansi
that
I can contact with questions about the railroads there?

> Does anyone in the IRFCA live in or near Jhansi India. If so, email
me.
I would like to discuss Jhansi with you.

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